[ International Socialism nr. 144 ]
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Der blev fundet 24 artikler

Fra International Socialism Journal nr. 144

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Contents (ISJ 144, Autumn 2014)

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Contributors (ISJ 144, Autumn 2014)

144

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Keir McKechnie: Analysis: Scotland: the genie is out of the bottle

144

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The British ruling class wheezed a huge collective sigh of relief at the Scottish independence referendum result. The No camp secured victory with 55 percent of the vote and the Yes side polled 45 percent. 97 percent of the electorate registered to vote and the turn-out was an incredible 86 percent, the highest in any election in the history of Britain.

 

Alex Callinicos: Analysis: The multiple crises of imperialism

144

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If the United States remains the command centre of global capitalism, a multiplicity of crises has been flashing up on its screens in the past few months. Let’s consider them in ascending order of importance from the perspective of US decision makers.

 

Kevin Corr + Gareth Jenkins: The case of the disappearing Lenin

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What, if anything, do modern day socialists have to learn from Lenin? Capitalism is mired in its deepest and longest crisis since the 1930s, producing bitter discontent that in places overflows into mass resistance and even revolutions. With Stalinism all but dead and traditional reformist parties offering little beyond doing austerity in a fairer manner, revolution from below would seem to be an idea whose time has at long last returned.

 

Rob Ferguson: Ukraine: imperialism, war and the left

144

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The most powerful military alliance in the world met in Newport, Wales, at the beginning of September. It was, arguably, the most significant meeting of the NATO alliance since the fall of the Berlin Wall. Two issues dominated the NATO agenda: the rise of Islamic State and, beyond all expectations, the apparent success of Vladimir Putin’s strategy in Ukraine.

 

Charlie Kimber: South Africa: from Marikana to the “Numsa moment”

144

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On 16 August 2012 South African police shot and killed 34 striking workers at the Lonmin mine near Rustenburg. The massacre sent shockwaves around the world—and the implications of this political earthquake are far from played out. It is likely to be seen as one of the key elements that began a process leading to a mass worker-based party to the left of the African National Congress—a development of global importance. We are seeing the beginning of a major challenge to the class compromises of 1994 that saw the end of apartheid and the start of ANC rule.

 

Nicola Ginsburgh: Lise Vogel and the politics of women’s liberation

144

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A review of Lise Vogel, Marxism and the Oppression of Women: Toward a Unitary Theory (Haymarket, 2014), £19.99
Growing anger and activism around the issue of women’s oppression have seen the return of many arguments from the 1970s and 1980s regarding the usefulness or otherwise of Marxist analysis in exploring this oppression. The reissuing of Lise Vogel’s work, originally published in 1983, though largely neglected at that time, is a welcome contribution to current debates.

 

Andreas Ytterstad: Good sense on global warming

144

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Good sense, for Antonio Gramsci, was the “healthy nucleus of common sense”. This article tries to make sense of what Gramsci meant by good sense, and seeks to develop his understanding of good sense into a resource we can use to stop runaway global warming in time. Although I conclude by briefly outlining the politics of good sense on global warming, the article is not primarily concerned with how we use good sense on global warming.

 

Talat Ahmed: Theories of difference: the Subaltern project examined

144

165

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A review of Vivek Chibber, Postcolonial Theory and the Specter of Capital (Verso, 2013), £19.99
Postcolonial theory has been the dominant intellectual trend within academia relating to studies of imperialism, decolonisation and the legacy of empire for the last two decades. Its central attractive feature has been to posit the non-Western world and its peoples as the subject of history and central agents shaping their own destiny.

 

Adrian Budd: Debating imperialism

144

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A review of Leo Panitch and Sam Gindin, The Making of Global Capitalism: The Political Economy of American Empire (Verso, 2012), £20
As the world commemorates the centenary of the First World War (with limited awareness of its meaning) a book by two leading Marxists that explores contemporary imperialism demands our careful assessment.

 

Elizabeth Humphrys + Tad Tietze: Feedback: “Anti-politics” and the return of the social: A reply to Alex Callinicos

144

187

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In his diagnosis of the causes of the crisis of the radical left in the last issue of this journal, Alex Callinicos criticised the “anti-politics” analysis that we have developed over recent years, in particular at our blog Left Flank.

 

Sabby Sagall: Feedback: Marxism, psychology and genocide: a reply to Andy Ridley

144

197

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Andy Ridley’s review of my book on genocide, Final Solutions: Human Nature, Capitalism and Genocide, charges me with two principal errors: psychologism and, less centrally, a mistaken analysis of the social basis of Nazism. Taking the second one first, Ridley asks: “Was it just the German middle classes that harboured such murderous potential?”

 

John Newsinger: Review: An episode from the end of empire

144

203

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Aaron Edwards, Mad Mitch’s Tribal Law: Aden and the End of Empire (Mainstream Publishing, 2014), £20
On 3 July 1967 the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders, under the command of Colonel Colin “Mad” Mitchell, reoccupied the town of Crater in Aden. The town had been in the hands of the insurgent National Liberation Front since the mutiny and uprising of 20 June that had left 22 British soldiers dead and 31 wounded.

 

Martin Empson: Review: Land and freedom

144

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Andro Linklater, Owning the Earth: The Transforming History of Land Ownership (Bloomsbury, 2014), £20
Throughout our history humans have had many different ways of using land. Alongside this, the question of ownership has also changed dramatically.

 

Xanthe Rose: Review: 50 years of theorising class

144

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Leo Panitch, Greg Albo and Vivek Chibber (eds), Socialist Register 2014: Registering Class (Merlin Press, 2013), £16.95
Discussion of classes, how they form, their composition and how they can act consciously have featured on the left since the time of Karl Marx. Such debates were among those leading to the formation in 1964 of the journal Socialist Register, which has been published annually since. This, the 50th edition, returns to an examination of class in the light of changing capitalist productive and social relations.

 

Miriam Scharf: Review: The contested history of the left and Zionism

144

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Philip Mendes, Jews and the Left: the Rise and Fall of a Political Alliance (Palgrave Macmillan, 2014), £65, and Paul Kelemen, The British Left and Zionism: History of a Divorce (Manchester University Press, 2012), £15.99
These two books, one concentrating on Jews and the left internationally and the other on Zionism and the British left, show some convergence in their pre Second World War coverage of left support for Zionism. But the different political perspectives of the authors—Mendes is pro-Zionist and Kelemen is not—lead to very different references, analyses and commentary for the period after the establishment of the state of Israel.

 

Des Barrow: Review: Love football—hate Fifa

144

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Dave Zirin, Brazil’s Dance with the Devil: The World Cup, the Olympics, and the Fight for Democracy (Haymarket, 2014), £11.99
Dave Zirin is a left wing sports writer from the United States who has written extensively on the Olympics, including a biography of John Carlos. Here he digs beneath the shiny surface of Brazil projected by the ruling Workers’ Party (PT) and details how they are using mega sporting events—the 2014 football world cup and 2016 Olympic Games—both to promote an image (of a stable democracy and a powerhouse economy), and as tools with which to further their neoliberal project.

 

David Szuster: Review: Muslims ate my hamster!

144

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Nathan Lean, The Islamophobia Industry: How the Right Manufactures Fear of Muslims (Pluto Press, 2012), £12.50
Nathan Lean’s book is a most welcome riposte to the Muslim scare stories that saturate our media, firstly by uncovering the falsity behind these stories and secondly by exposing the nefarious web of Islamophobic bloggers, businessmen, politicians, journalists, lobbyists and activists who manufacture and sell this paranoid vision of imminent Muslim takeover for their own political and private ends.

 

Alex Callinicos: Review: A revolutionary impatience

144

218

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Daniel Bensaïd, An Impatient Life: A Political Memoir (Verso, 2013), £24.99
Daniel Bensaïd was, as Tariq Ali says in his foreword to this autobiography, “France’s leading Marxist public intellectual” until he died at the age of 63 in 2010. For many years he had lived with the prospect of an early death, and so he wrote a bewilderingly rapid succession of books.

 

Mark Dunk: Review: To sleep, perchance to resist?

144

219

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Jonathan Crary, 24/7: Late Capitalism and the Ends of Sleep (Verso, 2014), £7.99
Touted as a short, sharp polemic on the expansion of capital into every waking minute, 24/7 is a curiosity that promises much but delivers little.

 

Tony Phillips: Review: Workers against the slaughter

144

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A W Zurbrugg (ed) Not Our War: Writings against the First World War (Merlin, 2014), £12.95
Not our War is the perfect antidote to renewed attempts by the spokespersons of the ruling class such as Michael Gove and Jeremy Paxman to rehabilitate the First World War as a war for democracy. The book is an anthology of voices, ranging from those of revolutionary Marxists, anarchists and syndicalists to pacifists and feminists raised against the slaughter both before and during the war.

 

Alex Callinicos + Camilla Royle: Pick of the quarter: This quarter’s selection

144

224

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Socialism and Democracy – History Workshop Journal – New Left Review

 

Vincent Sung: The birth of a new generation under tear gas: the umbrella movement in Hong Kong

144

 

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The Umbrella Movement, which involves every walk of life in Hong Kong, is entirely different from Hong Kong’s previous mass protests in the past few decades. This is due to its unprecedented methods of struggle, massive disruption of public order, its peacefulness and its spontaneity. The political issue was its triggering point, but there are profound social and economical tensions underlying the movement.

 

Der blev fundet 24 artikler

< Nr. 143 –– Nr. 145 >

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www.socialister.dk – 22. september 2017 kl. 20:56