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Tema: Storbritannien

Se også: Se også: Borgerl. rev.: England; Nazister: Storbritannien; Krise og modstand - Storbritannien

Storbritannien
Se også: Borgerl. rev.: England; Nazister: Storbritannien; Krise og modstand - Storbritannien
John Newsinger: Hearts and minds: The myth and reality of British counter-insurgency
International Socialism Journal nr. 148, okt 15 – side 135
Note: Up until ten years ago the British army boasted of an expertise in counter-insurgency warfare from which other armies could learn. Whereas the French had suffered humiliating defeats in Indo-China and Algeria and the United States had been driven out of Vietnam, the British had defeated Communist insurgency in Malaya. Moreover, in their wars, both the French and US militaries had disgraced themselves by their excesses, their use of torture and their disproportionate use of fire-power. By way of contrast, the British had developed a methodology for conducting counter-insurgency that had kept their hands clean.
 
Andrew Stone: Yours truly, Angry Mob
International Socialism Journal nr. 132, okt 11 – side 221
Note: David Horspool, The English Rebel: One Thousand Years of Troublemaking, from the Normans to the Nineties (Penguin, 2010), £12.99
Edward Vallance, A Radical History of Britain (Abacus, 2010), £12.99
Both these books provide extensive evidence to counter the historically illiterate arguments deployed to condemn the August riots.
 
Nathan Akehurst: Our Right to Protest
Socialist Review nr. 359, jun 11 – side 7
Note: We are all familiar with the continuing attacks on the welfare state, public sector, and vulnerable groups in society by a raft of ideological spending cuts. In addition to that, we have seen a barrage of assaults on the basic democratic and civil right to assemble and protest, a phenomenon that has reached new heights of savagery in recent weeks.
 
Keith Flett: I love the sound of breaking glass: the London crowd, 1760-2010
International Socialism Journal nr. 130, apr 11 – side 155
Note: On the BBC’s Weekly Politics programme on 9 December 2010 the historian David Starkey commented on the tuition fees protests in London that day that the capital had seen nothing like it since the Chartist period of the 1840s. Starkey is a historian of the 16th not the 19th century so he is hardly best placed to make an informed comment. However, the broader point was well made.
 
Paul Blackledge: Book review: Irrational records
International Socialism Journal nr. 127, jul 10 – side 217
Note: Terry Thomas, Criminal Records: A Database for the Criminal Justice System and Beyond (Palgrave, 2007), £45
In this important, historically informed mapping of contemporary criminal records policy Terry Thomas overviews the emergence and growth of criminal records from the Victorian period through to the present day to illuminate the modern system as a whole.
 
Michael Lavalette: The best democracy money can buy?
Socialist Review nr. 337, jun 09 – side 10
Note: As workers lose their jobs and homes because of the recession, MPs from all the main parties have been caught on a spending spree with taxpayers' money. Michael Lavalette, a socialist councillor in Preston, makes the case for political representation with principles.
 
Gordon Brown gives Israel a licence to kill
Socialist Worker nr. 2135, jan 09 – side 16
Note: The Israeli army’s murderous assault on Gaza has been carried out with weapons made in Britain.
The British government licensed £24 million of British arms exports to Israel in the first half of last year – a £6 million increase on exports licensed during the whole of 2007.
 
Sadie Robinson: Huge protest stands with the Palestinians
Socialist Worker nr. 2133, jan 09 – side 2
Note: Fury has exploded onto the streets of Britain in response to Israel’s barbaric assault on Gaza. Big demonstrations in solidarity with the Palestinian people have taken place in towns and cities across the country.
 
Hassan Mahamdallie: Britain: Muslim working class struggles
International Socialism Journal nr. 113, jan 07 – side 93
Note: One product of the demonisation of Britain’s Muslims by those forces desperate to provide a scapegoat for the fallout from the ‘war on terror’ has been a concerted effort to separate them out from the rest of society, to make them seem ‘alien’ and culturally distant—especially in the eyes of the wider working class. These attacks obscure the reality that the majority of Muslims (though not all, of course) belong to the working class.
 
Hassan Mahamdallie: Racism: myths and realities
International Socialism Journal nr. 95, jun 02 – side 3
Note: Race is once again at the centre of politics in Britain. New Labour's attacks on asylum seekers and the racist backlash against Muslims since 11 September have fuelled the far right, creating an atmosphere in which the Nazi BNP could gain three council seats in the north West mill toven of Burnley. Hassan Mahamdallie lays bare the facts about racism in Britain, looking at the economic and social position of blacks and Asians in Britain today. With the first ever black cabinet minister in place, can New Labour offer a bulwark against racism? If not, what strategy should the left adopt?
 
Paul O’Flinn: From the kingdom of necessity to the kingdom of freedom: Morris's News From Nowhere
(C Wilmer (ed): "William Morris: News from Nowhere and other Writings")

International Socialism Journal nr. 72, sep 96 – side 101
 
Hassan Mahamdallie: William Morris and revolutionary Marxism: crossing the 'river of fire'
International Socialism Journal nr. 71, jun 96 – side 57
Note: William Morris's centenary has proved that he is the socialist the middle classes would most like to love­if it wasn't for his politics. Hassan Mahamdallie looks at the historical and social background to Morris's life, the development of his socialism and at the revolutionary behind the artist.
 
Gareth Jenkins: Why Lucky Jim turned right' – an obituary of Kingsley Amis
International Socialism Journal nr. 70, mar 96 – side 103
Note: Kingsley Amis' very different life ended last year. Gareth Jenkins cuts through plaudits Amis' novels received and provides a critical view of his work.
 
Nicolai Gentchev: The myth of welfare dependency
International Socialism Journal nr. 69, dec 95 – side 37
Note: Class is still the factor which dominates life in modern Britain. In a complementary series of articles Nicolai Gentchev looks at the Tories' latest excuse for attacking the welfare state and explodes the myth of welfare dependency.
 
Judy Cox: Wealth, poverty and class in Britain today
International Socialism Journal nr. 69, dec 95 – side 49
Note: Judy Cox examines the class structure which lies behind the widening gap between rich and poor.
 
Peter Morgan: Trade unions and strikes a snapshot of the industrial scene
International Socialism Journal nr. 69, dec 95 – side 69
Note: Peter Morgan reviews a new TUC report and reveals a more optimistic picture of union strength than most media commentators and establishment politicians admit.
 
Nick Howard: The rise and fall of socialism in one city (Clyde Binfield et al (eds): "The History of the City of Sheffield 1843-1993" + Manuel Castells: "The City and the Grassroots" + Stuart Lowe: "Urban Social Movements – The City After Castells")
International Socialism Journal nr. 69, dec 95 – side 97
Note: Developments in class struggle in the city of Sheffield.
 
Ruth Brown: Racism and immigration controls
International Socialism Journal nr. 68, sep 95 – side 3
Note: Racism and immigration controls are two stock responses for any unpopular Tory government. Britain's current Conservative administration is no exception-the latest in a long line of racist legislation aimed at immigrants is due on the statute books this autumn. Ruth Brown looks at the history of immigration controls, charts their intimate connection with the capitalist system's need for labour power and details the role of the Labour Party in allowing the political agenda to be determined by the racist right.
 
Andy Strouthous: Are the unions in decline?
International Socialism Journal nr. 41, dec 88 – side 113
Note: In both "Are the unions in decline?" and "Socialists and the unions" Andy Strouthous and Jack Robertson attack the idea that there is an irreversible change in the class structure which has deprived the working class of its power to change society. These ideas, associated with Marxism Today but enjoying a wide circulation in the Labour Party, were also the subject of Ann Roger's "Is there a new underclass" in our last issue.
 
Ann Rogers: Is there a new underclass?
International Socialism Journal nr. 40, sep 88 – side 65
 
Storbritannien før 1900
Ian Birchall: The enemy’s enemy: Disraeli and working class leadership
International Socialism Journal nr. 137, jan 13 – side 149
Note: At the most recent Labour Party conference party leader Ed Miliband caused a certain amount of consternation by praising Benjamin Disraeli (Tory prime minister 1868 and 1874-80), and repeatedly using Disraeli’s most famous phrase “One Nation”. Just to make sure nobody had missed the point, he repeated the words 46 times.
 
Hassan Mahamdallie: William Morris: Victorian artist and revolutionary
Socialist Worker nr. 2183, jan 10 – side 13
Note: Famous for his art, William Morris's commitment to socialism and struggle is less well known.
 
Andrew Stone: Book Review: Matches made in hell
International Socialism Journal nr. 125, jan 10 – side 128
Note: Louise Raw, Striking a Light: The Bryant and May Matchwomen and their Place in Labour History (Continuum, 2009), £70
 
John Rees: Oliver Cromwell’s legacy
Socialist Worker nr. 2117, sep 08 – side 13
Note: John Rees explains the relevance for today of Cromwell – the decisive figure of the English Revolution of the 1640s – who died 350 years ago this week.
 
Keith Flett: The Making of a London Suburb: Capital Comes To Penge
Socialist Worker nr. 2097, apr 08 – side 9
Note: Capitalism, and resistance to it, has shaped the environment in which we live. Martin Spence has written a new book The Making of a London Suburb: Capital Comes To Penge. It examines how the system transformed London, and the suburb of Penge, into the major city it is today. Martin, the assistant general secretary of the Bectu broadcasting union, spoke to Keith Flett.
 
Keith Flett: Review: Chartism in one town
International Socialism Journal nr. 117, jan 08 – side 192
Note: Review: Robert G Hall, Voices of the People (Merlin, 2007), £15.95
 
Andrew Stone: The Putney debates: Visions of democracy
Socialist Worker nr. 2076, nov 07 – side 13
Note: In the midst of the English Revolution some 360 years ago, radical anti-royalists outlined their plans for a new egalitarian society. Andrew Stone looks back at the legacy of the Putney Debates
 
James Dean: Victor Grayson: remembering an independent socialist MP
Socialist Worker nr. 2065, aug 07 – side 13
Note: A militant and independent socialist who was elected to parliament a century ago, shouldn’t be forgotten, writes James Dean.
 
Judy Cox: Review: Chartism's hidden history
International Socialism Journal nr. 114, apr 07 – side 210
Note: Keith Flett, Chartism After 1848: the Working Class and the Politics of Radical Education (Merlin Press, 2006), £15.95
 
Michael Löwy: Imagining other worlds
International Socialism Journal nr. 112, sep 06 – side 215
Note: A review of Matthew Beaumont: "Utopia Ltd: Ideologies of Social Dreaming in England 1870-1900" (Brill, 2005), €58
 
Mark O’Brien: The bloody birth of capitalism
(J L and B Hammond: "The Village Labourer")

International Socialism Journal nr. 70, mar 96 – side 119
Note: Mark O'Brien reviews a classic history of the rise of the British working class
 
Peter Linebaugh: 'To the teeth and forehead of our faults' (V A C Gatrell: "The Hanging Tree: Execution and the English People, 1770-1868")
International Socialism Journal nr. 68, sep 95 – side 93
Note: Peter Linebaugh is the author of "The London Hanged".
 
Peter Linebaugh: Days of villainy: a reply to two critics
International Socialism Journal nr. 63, jun 94 – side 111
Note: Peter Linebaugh, author of the widely acclaimed "The London Hanged", replies to the establishment critics of that book.
 
Colin Barker: In praise of custom (E P Thompson: "Customs in Common")
International Socialism Journal nr. 55, jun 92 – side 127
 
John Charlton: Crime and class in the 18th century (Peter Linebaugh: "The London Hanged. Crime and Civil Society in the Eighteenth Century")
International Socialism Journal nr. 54, mar 92 – side 153
 
Ray Challinor: Peter Murray McDouall and ‘Physical Force’ Chartism
International Socialism Journal nr. 12, mar 81 – side 53
Note: Chartism has been Britain’s biggest and most significant mass revolutionary movement to date. In the 1830s and 1840s it mobilised millions of workers. Peter Murray McDouall remained a Chartist leader throughout these turbulent years. Furthermore in every major battle – 1839, 1842, 1848 – he consistently advocated the same policies. McDouall was the foremost exponent of physical force.
 
Storbritannien 1900-1945
Bob Light: Book Review: Nine days that shaped the words
International Socialism Journal nr. 151, jul 16 – side 208
Note: A review of Charles Ferrall and Dougal McNeill, Writing the 1926 General Strike: Literature, Culture, Politics (Cambridge University Press, 2015), £55
This is an exemplary book which does exactly what it says on the tin, examining how the 1926 General Strike is inscribed in writing in a variety of genres over the subsequent 50 years.
 
Shaun Doherty: Book Review: Learning the lessons of the past
International Socialism Journal nr. 149, jan 16 – side 210
Note: John Newsinger, Them and Us: Fighting the Class War 1910-1939 (Bookmarks, 2015), £7.99
John Newsinger opens this timely account of working class struggle in the first half of the 20th century with what at first seems an incongruous statement: “We live in a period of unprecedented class warfare”. But he argues that the only reason this sounds strange is that the war has been so brutally one-sided in recent years.
 
Greg Jones: Film Review: Relatives bring the 1926 General Strike in Fife to life
Socialist Worker nr. 2343, mar 13 – side 13
Note: A powerful new film, The Happy Lands, recreates the General Strike of 1926 with non-professional actors and relatives of the strikers, says Greg Jones.
 
John Gray: Titanic: A disaster built on class
Socialist Worker nr. 2298, apr 12 – side 8
Note: A hundred years ago the sinking of the Titanic exposed capitalists’ contempt for ordinary people, argues historian John Gray
 
Tim Evans: The Great Unrest and a Welsh town
International Socialism Journal nr. 131, jul 11 – side 153
Note: The key confrontation of Britain’s first national railway strike—for better pay and an end to an unfair arbitration system—occurred on Saturday 19 August 1911 in Llanelli, a tinplate-producing town in south west Wales.
 
Charlie Kimber: Llanelli 1911: war on the railways
Socialist Worker nr. 2181, dec 09 – side 13
Note: The great railway strike of 1911 saw incredible battles between workers, scabs, bosses and soldiers.
 
Chris Bambery: Syndicalism and the limits of radical trade unionism
Socialist Worker nr. 2104, jun 08 – side 13
Note: Chris Bambery looks at the issues raised by some fascinating debates between revolutionaries and left wing trade unionists in the early 20th century.
 
Matthew Cookson: Labour in crisis: Labour’s ‘Great betrayal’ led to the brink of collapse
Socialist Worker nr. 2103, maj 08 – side 6
Note: In the first part of our new series on past crises in the Labour Party Matthew Cookson looks at the party’s response to the 1930s.
 
Judy Cox: Beyond the Pankhursts
International Socialism Journal nr. 112, sep 06 – side 199
Note: A review of Jill Liddington: "Rebel Girls: Their Fight for the Vote" (Virago Press, 2006), £14.99
 
Martin Smith: Bookwatch: the General Strike
International Socialism Journal nr. 70, mar 96 – side 155
Note: Martin Smith's Bookwatch celebrates the 70th anniversary of the General Strike.
 
Julie Waterson: The party at its peak (Nina Fishman: "The British Communist Party and the Trade Unions, 1933-45")
International Socialism Journal nr. 69, dec 95 – side 77
 
Donny Gluckstein: Revolt on the Clyde (1919)
Socialist Review nr. 116, jan 89 – side 22
Note: The year 1919 was one of dramatic and social upheaval throughout the world. Inspired by the Russian Revolution and angered by the bosses behaviour at the end of the war, workers in country after country clashed with their rulers. In Britain Glasgow became the focus of workers struggle.
Donny Gluckstein examines the events and their outcome.
 
Tony Cliff: The tragedy of A J Cook
International Socialism Journal nr. 31, mar 86 – side 69
Note: A J Cook was a leader of the miners during the 1926 General Strike
 
Caspar Diklev: Generalstrejken i England 1926: Med hænderne i skødet
Socialistisk Arbejderavis nr. 6, mar 85 – side 6
Note: Selvom TUC – det engelske LO – fik syv måneder til at forberede en generalstrejke i 1926, så gjorde de intet ud over at holde brandtaler for medlemmerne, hvori de forklarede hvor fast de stod, og hvilken magt fagbevægelsen egentlig besad. Derimod var den engelske regering helt klar over situationens alvor, og den forberedte sig grundigt.
 
Mike Haynes: The British working class in revolt: 1910-1914
International Socialism Journal nr. 22, dec 83 – side 87
 
Storbritannien 1945-1979
Dave Sewell: 1972 – when tenants struck
Socialist Worker nr. 2356, jun 13 – side 14
Note: Mass workers’ resistance and rent strikes in the 1970s showed how to beat attacks on tenants—despite betrayals by Labour and union leaders.
 
Martin Upchurch: Protest-movements: Remembering the Bristol bus boycott
Socialist Review nr. 380, maj 13 – side 21
Note: Fifty years ago this month a few committed activists from Bristol's 3,000-strong black community launched a remarkable and ultimately successful campaign.
 
Keith Flett: A class that made itself
Socialist Review nr. 379, apr 13 – side 16
Note: Socialist historian E P Thompson’s classic book The Making of the English Working Class was first published 50 years ago. Keith Flett takes a look at this seminal work of labour history that placed workers at the centre of making their own history.
 
Julian Alford: A trade union whodunit
International Socialism Journal nr. 133, jan 12 – side 220
Note: Alan Thornett, Militant Years: Car Worker Struggles in Britain in the 60s and 70s (Resistance Books, 2011), £12
 
1972 – when building workers shut down the country
Socialist Worker nr. 2274, okt 11 – side 8
Note: In 1972 over 300,000 building workers struck across Britain over pay and contracts.
 
Simon Basketter: Winter of discontent: How strikers took on the British state – and won
Socialist Worker nr. 2183, jan 10 – side 3
Note: This is the story told in government papers about the ‘Winter of discontent’ in 1978-79, released under the “30-year rule”, explains Simon Basketter.
 
John Basketter: Documents reveal Labour government was prepared to crush discontent
Socialist Worker nr. 2134, jan 09 – side 12
Note: Thirty years ago James Callaghan’s Labour government was prepared to use troops to break strikes over pay.
 
Ken Olende: The Notting Hill riot and a carnival of defiance
Socialist Worker nr. 2115, aug 08 – side 13
Note: Resistance to a vicious race riot in west London fifty years ago this week inspired the creation of the Notting Hill Carnival, writes Ken Olende.
 
Matthew Cookson: Labour in crisis: Nye Bevan’s capitulation and the left’s defeat
Socialist Worker nr. 2104, jun 08 – side 6
Note: In the second part of our series Matthew Cookson looks at the battle in the Labour Party in the 1950s.
 
Sabby Sagall: Ford machinists’ strike, 1968: An inspiring strike for women’s rights
Socialist Worker nr. 2104, jun 08 – side 6
Note: In 1968 Rose Boland, the leading steward in the Ford machinists’ strike was interviewed for Socialist Worker by Sabby Sagall. Here he recalls the importance of the dispute and we reprint an edited version of the interview.
 
Which way now for the left?
Socialist Worker nr. 2102, maj 08 – side 8
Note: Gordon Brown has concluded that his trashing in local elections earlier this month means that Labour needs to move further to the right. Socialist Worker spoke to a range of leading figures and activists on the left to gauge their response, and to ask them what needs to be done.
 
Simon Basketter: Enoch Powell and racism
Socialist Worker nr. 2097, apr 08 – side 13
Note: Simon Basketter looks back at the impact of the infamous 1968 “Rivers of Blood” speech.
 
Chris Harman: In Perspective: Workers' unity in the face of Enoch Powell's racism
Socialist Review nr. 324, apr 08 – side 13
Note: Socialists watched in despair when dockers and building workers marched in support of Enoch Powell's "rivers of blood" speech. But the tide turned and a few years later dockers were marching for Grunwick strikers.
 
Lewisham 1977: the day we turned the tide on the Nazi National Front
Socialist Worker nr. 2064, aug 07 
Note: Thirty years ago this week the apparently unstoppable rise of the Nazi National Front (NF) met a serious challenge. On Saturday 13 August 1977 a Nazi march through Lewisham in south London faced a counter demonstration by thousands of anti-fascists. The fascists’ march was stopped.
 
Simon Basketter: Book Review: David Kynaston: Austerity Britain, 1945-1951
Socialist Review nr. 315, jun 07 – side 28
Note: "Dreariness is everywhere," wrote one schoolteacher in 1948. "Streets are deserted, lighting is dim, people's clothes are shabby and their tables bare." David Kynaston's history of the period from 1945 to 1951 is full of anecdotes recorded in diaries and letters, and from the Mass Observation archive. It is both the book's strength and its weakness. He says he aims to tell "the story of ordinary citizens as well as ministers and mandarins".
 
John Newsinger: Been here before
International Socialism Journal nr. 111, jun 06 – side 179
Note: A review of Stephen G Rabe: "US Intervention in British Guiana: A Cold War Story" (University of North Carolina Press, 2005), £14.50
 
Martin Smith: The jubilee: No future in England's dream (punk music)
Socialist Review nr. 264, jun 02 – side 18
Note: Punk was the perfect antidote to the 1977 jubilee, says Martin Smith, because it stuck two fingers up to the establishment.
 
Dave Renton: Past its peak (N Branson: "History of the Communist Party of Great Britain 1941-1951")
International Socialism Journal nr. 77, dec 97 – side 127
Note: Dave Renton discloses the history of the Communist Party in wartime.
 
John Saville: Britain, the Marshall Plan and the Cold War
International Socialism Journal nr. 46, mar 90 – side 143
Note: M J Hogan: “The Marshall Plan, America, Britain, and the reconstruction of Western Europe, 1947-1952” + P Weiler: “British Labour and the Cold War” + H Pelling: “Britain and the Marshall Plan”)
John Saville, one of the best known Marxist historians whose most recent book is 1848-the British State and the Chartist Movement, turns his attention to the roots of the Cold War and the Marshall Plan. His timely review article gives us a chance to look back at the origins of a period that now seems to be passing away.
 
Gareth Jenkins: A winter's tale
Socialist Review nr. 117, feb 89 – side 14
Note: Why did the Tories win the election in May 1979? One common explanation is that the "winter of discontent", which took place ten years ago, was the cause – that militant trade unionism must inevitabley cost Labour elections. Gareth Jenkins argues otherwise
 
Geoff Ellen: Labour and strikebreaking 1945-51
International Socialism Journal nr. 24, jun 84 – side 45
 
Dave Beecham: The ruling class offensive
International Socialism Journal nr. 7, dec 79 – side 1
Note: Dave Beecham takes a look behind the enemy’s lines in the class struggle in Britain today.
 
Chris Harman: Merseyside: The testing ground
Socialist Review nr. 1, apr 78 – side 10
Note: Seven or eight years ago people on the left used to talk about Merseyside as the ‘Petrograd’ of Britain. It was the greatest centre of the militancy that broke through the last Labour government pay policy in 1969-70 and rocked the Tory government in 1972.
 
Notes of the Month: Three Months on the Streets
International Socialism Journal (1st series) nr. 101, sep 77 – side 3
Note: THE MOOD has begun to change. After three years of Social Contract workers are moving into struggle. The signs are everywhere. Consider Grunwick’s.
 
The Cuts: Introduction
International Socialism Journal (1st series) nr. 99, jun 77 – side 15
Note: 3 YEARS ago when Qwen Evans and Lucy Dyer, ancillaries at Poplar Hospital, talked their way into the ship repair yards, past the dock gates and into the sweatshops of the Isle of Dogs to try and organise resistance to the closure of their hospital by the people who used it, they didn’t realise they were pioneers.
 
Wayne Asher: Notes of the Month: Powellism, Racism and the Conservative Party Today
International Socialism Journal (1st series) nr. 87, apr 76 – side 6
Note: Eight years ago, on 20 April, Enoch Powell made his most famous speech on race relations, in which he predicted ‘rivers of blood’ if black immigration were not halted. The speech received amazing publicity, making headlines in most papers of any importance and receiving support from many. Overnight the race issues moved to the centre of the political stage as, to the glee of the ruling class, economic issues took a back seat. It set off a phenomenon as militant London dockers struck in support.
 
Mike Jones: England: Minearbejderstrejken
Proletar! nr. 8, maj 74 – side 16
 
Editorial: Incomes Policy
International Socialism Journal (1st series) nr. 36, apr 69 – side 1
Note: ‘Industrial relations are in a bad way and will not be improved unless the trade-union leadership is subjected to heavy pressure.’ (Andrew Schonfield, member of the Donovan Commission, quoted in The Observer, 19th January 1969.)
Ever since the British ruling class began discussing ‘incomes policy’ seriously, it has been clear that legislation restricting the right to strike must follow. The White Paper (humorously entitled In Place of Strife) is therefore no surprise. Its proposals make sense in relation to the government’s general wage-freeze strategy.
 
Martin Shaw: Survey: LSE: Lockout and After
International Socialism Journal (1st series) nr. 36, apr 69 – side 9
Note: On 24th January the students at the London School of Economics tore down steel gates erected to control sit-ins and occupations, bringing on themselves a three and a half week closure of the School in which police and law courts were used by the LSE authorities against the students. Although the authorities have now been forced to open the college, legal and disciplinary action is still (at the beginning of March) under way against some staff and students. Students are still faced with a long fight against these measures.
 
Jim Kincaid: Survey: Welfare: Pensions Plans
International Socialism Journal (1st series) nr. 36, apr 69 – side 11
Note: After many promises, the government’s major review of social security which began in 1964 came to eventual fruition in a White Paper on old age pensions which appeared in January 1969. Never was reformism so creeping. The higher pensions proposed will not come fully into effect until 20 years after the inception of the new scheme – i.e. probably not before 1992. No one who is over the age of 42 will get a fully matured earnings related pension. No proposals are made for alleviating the poverty of existing pensioners.
 
Duncan Hallas: Survey: Teachers
International Socialism Journal (1st series) nr. 36, apr 69 – side 13
Note: When in February, a special conference of the National Union of Teachers voted by 130,000 to 90,000 to accept the employer’s final salaries offer it voted to accept, without protest, a cut in real wages for the majority of its members. The increase offered and accepted was 6 per cent on the basic scale to operate from 1st April 1969 until 31st March 1971. A 9 per cent increase was needed to restore the purchasing power of the basic scale to the level of 1st April 1967!
 
Dave Purdy: Prospects for British Capitalism
International Socialism Journal (1st series) nr. 36, apr 69 – side 29
Note: The road to socialism is paved with bad predictions. Cautious realism and millenarian optimism tend to succeed each other in the socialist movement in a way which is itself almost predictable, in as much as this political prognostication cycle seems to be inversely related to currently held intuitions about the economic prospects for Western capitalism.
 
Editorial: The Cuts
International Socialism Journal (1st series) nr. 32, mar 68 – side 1
Note: The paths of Britain’s retreat from classical colonialism and Labour’s retreat from reformism and Social Democracy converged on 16 January when the Government announced its package of measures to make devaluation ‘work.’ The successive measures are all directed at the same aim: to cut back the real income of the majority of the population.
 
Ian Macdonald: The Notebook: GLC Rents
International Socialism Journal (1st series) nr. 32, mar 68 – side 4
Note: The Greater London Council is Britain’s biggest landlord. There are about 242,000 tenants involved. On 7 December last year, the chairman of the GLC Housing Committee announced the Tories’ new rent scheme.
 
Martin Barker: The Merseyside Building Workers’ Movement – A Case History
International Socialism Journal (1st series) nr. 32, mar 68 – side 24
Note: For almost its entire history, Merseyside has been dominated by one industry: the docks. Associated with this is a peculiar sensitivity to economic fluctuations, especially when the industry is one that uses casual labour, and is essentially a transport industry. Merseyside has long been prone, therefore, to unemployment well above the national average. There are, at the time of writing, over 4,000 building workers alone on the dole, and because of the seasonal nature of the work, this figure can be much higher in winter.
 
Nigel Harris: The Decline of Welfare
International Socialism Journal (1st series) nr. 7, dec 61 – side 5
Note: It is not inevitable that in a class-society widespread poverty must exist, but historically in Britain it has seemed almost inevitable.
 
Storbritannien 1979-
Se også: Krise og modstand - Storbritannien
Alex Callinicos: Analysis: Brexit: a world-historic turn
International Socialism Journal nr. 151, jul 16 – side 3
Note: Britain’s vote on 23 June to leave the EU is an event of major geopolitical significance. It will have a disorganising effect on the nexus of alliances through which the Western imperialist powers, led by the United States, manage global capitalism. It is a very serious blow to the European Union.
 
Ralph Tebbutt: Does every child matter?
International Socialism Journal nr. 151, jul 16 – side 165
Note: How do we assess our education system? One way is to measure the extent to which that system is producing the skilled personnel required by the capitalist state in order to determine the cost effectiveness and efficiency of the system. The alternative is to start from what is necessary to enable each and every individual to fulfil their full potential within society. The aim of this article is to challenge the former approach and to discuss how the latter approach can be implemented.
 
Charlie Kimber: Efter EU-afstemningen og Camerons afgang: Gå sammen om at forme oprøret mod magthaverne
Socialistisk Arbejderavis nr. 352, maj 16 
Note: David Cameron er trådt tilbage, og “Forlad EU”-resultatet ved folkeafstemningen har kastet det konservative parti og de britiske og europæiske magthavere ud i en dyb krise.
 
Socialist Worker (UK): Storbritannien: Den herskende klasse er rædselsslagen for at skulle forlade det rådne EU
Socialistisk Arbejderavis nr. 352, maj 16 
Note: Valgkampen op til folkeafstemningen om Storbritanniens medlemskab af EU blev genoptaget mandag efter en pause i kølvandet på mordet på Labour-politikeren Jo Cox.
 
Alex Callinicos: Analysis: And now the British question
International Socialism Journal nr. 147, jul 15 – side 3
Note: The British general election of 7 May 2015 represented a curious mixture of stasis and dramatic change. But its outcome—the election of the first majority Tory government for 20 years—underlines that what we are confronted with is a crisis of the British state.
 
Alex Callinicos: Analysis: Britain and the crisis of the neoliberal state
International Socialism Journal nr. 145, jan 15 – side 3
Note: Antonio Gramsci writes: The “normal” exercise of hegemony on what has become the classic terrain of the parliamentary regime is characterised by the combination of force and consent that balance each other in various ways ...
 
Andy Jones: UKIP and the politics of immigration
International Socialism Journal nr. 143, jul 14 – side 37
Note: The outcome of May’s European and local council elections demonstrates beyond doubt both widespread disaffection with the traditional framework of British party politics and the fact that the issue of immigration is now placed firmly at the centre of political debate. In the European elections the UK Independence Party (UKIP) won 27.5 percent of the vote, becoming the first party other than the two main parties to win a national election in 100 years.
 
Iain Ferguson: Can the Tories abolish the welfare state?
International Socialism Journal nr. 141, jan 14 – side 13
Note: There is a scene in The Spirit of ‘45, director Ken Loach’s documentary about the achievements of the 1945-51 Labour government in Britain, where a general practitioner tells of visiting a poor family where a child was very ill with a hacking cough.
 
Dave Sewell: Rent arrears mount as Tories’ bedroom tax hits poor tenants
Socialist Worker nr. 2357, jun 13 – side 7
Note: The government’s hated bedroom tax came into force on 1 April. But the policy—and the Tories’ thin justifications for it—are already starting to fall apart.
 
Terry Wrigley + Nick Grant: Michael Gove – new ways to fail at school
Socialist Worker nr. 2357, jun 13 – side 10
Note: The education minister is doing what’s right for capitalism—not children say Nick Grant and Terry Wrigley
 
Weyman Bennett: After Woolwich
Socialist Review nr. 381, jun 13 – side 4
Note: The racist backlash after the murder of a soldier outside Woolwich barracks last month has been on a far greater scale than that following the 7 July 2005 bombings in London.
 
Tash Shifrin: UKIP: A breeding ground for racism
Socialist Review nr. 381, jun 13 – side 18
Note: Ukip’s success in last month’s council elections underlined its move from the margins to a more significant force. Tash Shifrin looks at the roots of its emergence and how we should respond.
 
Judith Orr: After Woolwich: Don’t let the racists divide us
Socialist Worker nr. 2355, maj 13 – side 1
Note: The Tories and the media refuse to accept any connection between imperialist attacks and the killing in Woolwich. Their pandering to Islamophobia has given confidence to racists and fascists. We must urgently oppose it.
 
Charlie Kimber: The resistible march of Thatcher
Socialist Review nr. 380, maj 13 – side 12
Note: The death of Margaret Thatcher was greeted by celebrations across the country, while the ruling class went into a frenzy as they attempted to defend her legacy. Here Charlie Kimber looks at that legacy.
 
Jane Hardy: Thatcher’s economic legacy
Socialist Review nr. 380, maj 13 – side 15
Note: When Thatcher was elected in 1979 the fortunes of British capitalism were lagging behind its competitors after decades of poor performance.
 
Pat Stack: Book review: Graham Stewart: Bang!
Socialist Review nr. 380, maj 13 – side 25
Note: There is a need for a serious study of the 1980s to be written, and Graham Stewart cannot be faulted for trying to capture much of the politics, culture and social change of the decade. Sadly however, he does it from a perspective so adoring of Margaret Thatcher that I suspect George Osborne's copy will be smudged by tear stains on almost every page.
 
John Davies: Hands off our bedrooms
Socialist Review nr. 379, apr 13 – side 4
Note: “Good morning, what a relief it was to see your leaflet come through my letterbox. Thank you.” It has not been often that we get that response to the campaigning work we do.
 
Rob Ferguson: Feedback: Lessons in class
Socialist Review nr. 379, apr 13 – side 8
Note: In my September article on the impact of tuition fees and university funding (Class Barriers, Socialist Review, September 2012) I noted that “the increase in fees has not immediately translated into a disproportionate fall in applications from the poorest school leavers as many predicted”.
 
Alex Callinicos: Why there’s trouble ahead for the Tories
Socialist Worker nr. 2340, feb 13 – side 6
Note: Last week ended well for David Cameron. Lined up with German chancellor Angela Merkel he secured, for the first time, a cut in the European Union’s long-term budget for 2014-20.
 
Alex Callinicos: Analysis: British sounds
International Socialism Journal nr. 137, jan 13 – side 3
Note: The dominant fact about British politics is the slow decomposition of the Conservative-Liberal coalition government. The fundamental reason for this is the failure of chancellor of the exchequer George Osborne’s deficit-cutting strategy.
 
Judith Orr: Rochdale: an anatomy of the sexual abuse scandal
International Socialism Journal nr. 135, jul 12 – side 67
Note: The case of nine men convicted of appalling sexual exploitation of young women in Rochdale in north west England has unleashed a renewed tide of racism and Islamophobia.
 
What Socialists Say: Does Britain have a north-south divide?
Socialist Worker nr. 2298, apr 12 – side 9
Note: When the Tories proposed the idea of imposing lower regional pay on public sector workers, it hit a nerve. Many who live outside the M25 already feel marginalised by the political establishment in London. The Tories in particular are often seen as pursuing a vendetta against the supposedly more working class north.
 
Liam Fox has gone: now hunt all the Tories
Socialist Worker nr. 2274, okt 11 – side 1
Note: Liam Fox resigned as Tory defence minister last week as the reality of corporations’ corrupt influence inside the government was revealed.
 
Richard Seymour: The Tories: An anatomy
International Socialism Journal nr. 131, jul 11 – side 45
Note: After 13 years of exile the Conservative Party has returned to office, but weaker than ever and dependent on a coalition with the Liberals.
 
Sadie Robinson: Teaching school heads to stop their bullying
Socialist Worker nr. 2254, jun 11 – side 13
Note: How to stand up to bullies is one of the most important lessons many of us learn in school. But a recent rash of teachers’ strikes against heads trying to ram through cuts shows that pupils aren’t the only ones who can discover the power to resist.
 
Mark Thomas: Fracture lines
Socialist Review nr. 359, jun 11 – side 4
Note: The outcome of the elections in early May has deepened the fracture lines inside the government Coalition.
 
Patrick Ward: Rich-poor divide going back to Victorian times
Socialist Worker nr. 2252, maj 11 – side 2
Note: The gap between the highest and lowest paid in Britain is not only growing but is set to return to Victorian levels.
 
Matthew Cookson: Bring down the coalition
Socialist Worker nr. 2250, maj 11 – side 16
Note: The Tories and the Liberal Democrats dreaded voters giving them a hammering in this week’s elections for their vicious attacks on working people over the past year.
 
After 5 May elections: Organise to bring down the coalition
Socialist Worker nr. 2250, maj 11 
Note: The unpopularity of the coalition was shown in this week’s elections where the Liberal Democrats suffered their worst performance at the polls in 30 years.
 
Tom Walker: Meet the right royal scroungers
Socialist Worker nr. 2249, apr 11 – side 12
Note: They’re bone idle, filthy rich and live in palaces, explains Tom Walker, Junior assistant royal reporter.
 
Viv Smith: 'Disabled people won't be victims any more'
Socialist Worker nr. 2248, apr 11 – side 8
Note: Disabled activists speak out to Viv Smith.
 
Dave Renton: The Tories, Eton and private schools
International Socialism Journal nr. 130, apr 11 – side 141
Note: One of the most striking features of the new government is the dominance within its ranks of individuals showing every sign of class privilege. The Sunday Times reports that 18 of the 23 full-time members of the cabinet are millionaires, having between them a capital wealth of about £50 million.
 
Yuri Prasad: As David Cameron launches attack on multiculturalism: Don't let the Tories play the race card
Socialist Worker nr. 2238, feb 11 – side 1
Note: David Cameron choose last Saturday to launch a vicious attack on Muslims—just as the racist English Defence League were descending on Luton.
 
Editorial: Racism: part of a long Tory tradition
Socialist Worker nr. 2238, feb 11 – side 3
Note: That David Cameron chose last Saturday to make a speech attacking Muslims is despicable.
 
Michael Rosen: Defending Libraries
Socialist Review nr. 355, feb 11 – side 7
Note: Libraries have become one of the expendable, junkable parts of modern capitalism.
 
Julie Hopkins + Gerard Reissmann + Sarah Davies + Steve Hack + Karen Reissmann: Voices from the NHS: a system on the verge of breakdown
Socialist Worker nr. 2236, jan 11 – side 8
Note: As the Tories launch a major assault on the health service, frontline healthworkers speak out on the state of the NHS.
 
John Lang: Wapping striker speaks 25 years on: ‘If we’d had all of Fleet Street out we couldn’t have failed’
Socialist Worker nr. 2236, jan 11 
Note: When press baron Rupert Murdoch sacked 6,000 Fleet Street workers in 1986 and moved their work to a scab plant in Wapping, John Lang was deputy father of chapel in the Sogat union clerical branch at Times newspapers. He told a public meeting to commemorate the 25th anniversary about his experiences.
 
Alex Callinicos + Jonny Jones: Analysis: The student revolt and the crisis
International Socialism Journal nr. 129, jan 11 – side 3
Note: We enter 2011 in a situation marked by both continuity and—in Britain, at least—dramatic discontinuity. The element of continuity is represented, of course, by the global economic and financial crisis. Change comes in the form of the sudden emergence of the first real social movement in Britain for many years, the protests by university and school students against the near-trebling of tuition fees.
 
Judith Orr: Council of despair
Socialist Review nr. 354, jan 11 – side 4
Note: One way in which the coalition government is attempting to deflect anger about its austerity measures is to cut funding to local councils – meaning that the councils themselves are seen as inflicting the pain when libraries, youth centres and sports facilities close.
 
Kevin Devine: The cost of living through austerity
Socialist Review nr. 354, jan 11 – side 4
Note: The economic recovery remains elusive, but the cost of living remains high and looks set to go even higher in 2011.
 
Patrick Ward: Unhealthy profits
Socialist Review nr. 354, jan 11 – side 5
Note: The sickness of the economy has done little to dent the healthy profits of private hospitals.
 
Simon Basketter: Tories are a class apart: Exposing the myth of ‘ordinary bloke’ David Cameron and his ‘Mr Average’ friends
Socialist Worker nr. 2224, okt 10 – side 8
Note: For all its talk of a “national interest” and “we’re all in this together”, the government is made up of establishment figures who are a throwback to a previous era. Simon Basketter uncovers the Tories’ parallel universe.
 
Analysis: Britain: the mould cracks
International Socialism Journal nr. 127, jul 10 – side 10
Note: In Britain the drive to austerity is framed by the formation of the Conservative-Liberal Democrat coalition government. The novelty of such an arrangement in recent British politics has provoked an intense media hullabaloo focused on the persons of the new prime minister, David Cameron, and his Lib Dem deputy, Nick Clegg.
 
Simon Basketter: Ashcroft’s millions are tip of the iceberg
Socialist Worker nr. 2192, mar 10 – side 4
Note: Lord Ashcroft, who effectively owns the Tory party, hit the headlines as he admitted that he didn’t live here in order to avoid paying tax.
 
Siân Ruddick: Jail for British soldier who wouldn’t go to war
Socialist Worker nr. 2192, mar 10 – side 5
Note: Anti-war soldier Joe Glenton has been imprisoned for his refusal to fight in Afghanistan. A military court on Friday of last week sentenced him to nine months in the Military Corrective Training Centre in Colchester.
 
Ian Taylor: Cameron, Thatcher and the Tories: Return of the Nasty Party
Socialist Review nr. 345, mar 10 – side 14
Note: The prospect of a Tory government will chill all who remember the 1980s. Yet bad as David Cameron promises to be, a victory for him need not herald a rerun of the Thatcher years. Ian Taylor begins our pre-election coverage by analysing the prospect of a Cameron government and what it would mean.
 
Huge rise in number of children in severe poverty
Socialist Worker nr. 2186, jan 10 – side 2
Note: Child poverty in Britain was rocketing even before the recession, new research has shown.
 
A Sivanandan: John Denham is wrong to downplay race
Socialist Worker nr. 2185, jan 10 – side 5
Note: A Sivanandan, director of the Institute of Race Relations, explains why communities minister John Denham was wrong last week to downgrade the importance of racism.
 
SWP conference: Workers’ confidence to fight attacks is rising
Socialist Worker nr. 2184, jan 10 – side 5
Note: The session on the industrial response to the economic crisis saw a productive discussion about encouraging working class resistance.
 
Simon Basketter: Thatcher behind closed doors
Socialist Worker nr. 2183, jan 10 – side 3
Note: The newly released archives from 1979 give an insight into Margaret Thatcher’s thinking. They also show that, in private, Tories are even more reactionary than they are in public.
 
Anindya Bhattacharyya: It is still us and them
Socialist Worker nr. 2183, jan 10 – side 12
Note: After Gordon Brown’s recent ‘class war’ comments over old Etonians Anindya Bhattacharyya considers who makes up Britain’s ruling class
 
Judith Orr: The fog of class war
Socialist Review nr. 343, jan 10 – side 4
Note: Gordon Brown's government is waging class war against the rich, so claim the Tories – and the rich.
 
Patrick Ward: Lords-a-leeching
Socialist Review nr. 343, jan 10 – side 4
Note: Proposed reforms of the House of Lords expenses system have run into trouble – the lords aren't happy.
 
Patrick Ward: Who are the wealth creators?
Socialist Review nr. 343, jan 10 – side 5
Note: Advertisers and bankers are of less value to society than hospital cleaners and child minders, according to a report published last month.
 
Our universities of resistance: ‘A year ago this would have been unthinkable’
Socialist Worker nr. 2181, dec 09 – side 9
Note: Simon Englert from Sussex University on how the situation has radicalised even in British Universities
 
Simon Basketter: Car workers: being driven to destruction
Socialist Worker nr. 2180, dec 09 – side 13
Note: A new book looks at car workers’ struggles against ‘management by stress’. Simon Basketter spoke to the authors, and former and current car workers, about these ‘lean production’ methods – and how to fight back.
 
Siân Ruddick: Students lead fight over university cuts
Socialist Worker nr. 2180, dec 09 – side 14
Note: Universities across Britain are facing devastating cuts – but students and staff are fighting back.
 
Martin Smith: En test for venstrefløjen
Socialistisk Arbejderavis nr. 291, sep 09 – side 12
Note: Magthaverne udnytter den fortsatte økonomiske turbulens til at optrappe deres angreb på arbejderklassen. Men der er sket et skift i den måde, britiske arbejdere svarer igen på, argumenterer Martin Smith.
Alt. url: The current crisis is a test for the left
 
Swine flu: Labour in panic about pandemic
Socialist Worker nr. 2161, jul 09 – side 2
Note: More than 700 people have died from H1N1 swine flu around the world so far. The British government is in crisis-management mode—its announcement of hotlines follows contradictory advice for pregnant women.
 
Lindsey German: In my opinion: Unrepentant empire
Socialist Review nr. 338, jul 09 – side 7
Note: The long shadow of the Iraq war still hangs over British politics.
 
Alex Callinicos: Labour collapse, BNP victories: Political meltdown
Socialist Review nr. 338, jul 09 – side 10
Note: The economic and political crises have undermined the legitimacy of mainstream politics, argues Alex Callinicos. As Labour's support crashes can the left offer answers?
 
Sadie Robinson: Brown can’t escape the crisis he created
Socialist Worker nr. 2157, jun 09 – side 4
Note: Not long ago Gordon Brown looked like he was finished.
The week that Brown received multiple resignations from his cabinet also saw disastrous results for Labour in the council and European elections.
It seemed that he could be forced out of office any day.
But Brown has survived. And, what’s more, it seems that the bulk of Labour ministers have closed ranks around him.
 
Sadie Robinson: Soas: Did bosses target their cleaners for deportation?
Socialist Worker nr. 2156, jun 09 – side 2
Note: Were bosses of one of the most multicultural colleges in London complicit in an immigration raid that led to cleaners being deported to a country under a brutal regime?
 
Iain Ferguson: Probation: Labour passes buck over crime
Socialist Worker nr. 2156, jun 09 – side 12
Note: There are depressing similarities between the case of the two young French students Laurent Bonomo and Gabriel Ferez, brutally murdered in south London last July, and the case of Baby Peter, who died a slow and painful death in 2007 at the hands of his carers.
In each case, the supervising officer involved was carrying a caseload well beyond the recommended levels.
 
Patrick Ward: Policing the police
Socialist Review nr. 337, jun 09 – side 4
Note: The Territorial Support Group (TSG) – the "public order" section of the London Metropolitan police – has been accused of 159 assaults over the past year.
 
Simon Basketter: Expenses scandal: Jail these corrupt ministers
Socialist Worker nr. 2152, maj 09 – side 3
Note: The government hammers those most affected by the poverty and misery of Gordon Brown’s Britain with hypocrisy and draconian laws. Every week people are jailed for not paying their council tax or are dragged in front of the courts for not paying their TV licence.
 
Scarlet Knight: Not what I call care
Socialist Worker nr. 2152, maj 09 – side 12
Note: The solution to the current crisis in the care system lies with putting children at the heart of it, writes youth worker Scarlet Knight
 
Joseph Choonara: Darling's budget – the shape of cuts to come
Socialist Review nr. 336, maj 09 – side 4
Note: Alistair Darling is "Red All Over", wailed The Times. "Return Of Class War", screamed The Daily Telegraph.
Newspaper editors are presumably part of the 0.6 percent of the population who will be hit by the 50 percent top rate of income tax announced by the chancellor in his budget. But this measure should be put in context. When Labour last left office in 1979 the top rate was 83 percent.
 
Ian Taylor: In perspective: Myths of the white working class
Socialist Review nr. 336, maj 09 – side 14
Note: Talk of the existence of a unique and specifically deprived white working class being discriminated against conceals the real issue of class inequalities
 
Michael Lavalette + Iain Ferguson: Social work after “Baby P”
International Socialism Journal nr. 122, apr 09 – side 115
Note: In August 2007 the UK media reported the tragic death of a 17 month old boy (who became known as “Baby P”). In November 2008 two people were convicted of causing or allowing the death.
 
Amanda Sackur: Union-made: Further education: Time to expand, not cut
Socialist Review nr. 335, apr 09 – side 13
Note: London Metropolitan University is facing massive funding cuts after an audit by the Higher Education Funding Council for England (HEFCE) discovered that university management had been submitting inaccurate data.
 
Sadie Robinson: Rotherham: Labour’s forgotten heartland
Socialist Worker nr. 2139, feb 09 – side 8
Note: As unemployment in Britain heads towards two million, Sadie Robinson reports from Rotherham, a town at the centre of the jobs massacre
 
Esme Choonara: Nationalism: Who really benefits when ‘we’re all in it together’?
Socialist Worker nr. 2138, feb 09 – side 9
Note: Esme Choonara argues that nationalism is bad news for the workers’ movement
 
Alan Walter: Keep pushing Gordon Brown over council houses
Socialist Worker nr. 2137, feb 09 – side 4
Note: Gordon Brown announced last week that is he is backing down over rules that have stopped councils from building council housing.
 
Anindya Bhattacharyya: Exposing myths of a segregated Britain
Socialist Worker nr. 2137, feb 09 – side 8
Note: The popular perception that parts of Britain are becoming “ethnic no-go areas” is based on a misreading of the facts, population expert Ludi Simpson tells Anindya Bhattacharyya
 
Simon Basketter: New Labour peers paid fees by business lobbyists
Socialist Worker nr. 2136, jan 09 – side 2
Note: There are many odd things about the House of Lords. One minor anomaly is that lords don’t get paid a salary.
But they do get a tax free allowance of £335.50 for every day they bother to turn up at parliament.
These expenses are generous. For instance, in 2005 one Lord Taylor of Blackburn claimed over £57,000. But it has emerged there may be other ways for peers to make a little cash.
 
Kaye Stearman: Why is Britain supplying arms to Israel’s war machine?
Socialist Worker nr. 2136, jan 09 – side 9
Note: The proportion of British arms heading to Israel has increased in the last year, writes Kaye Stearman of the Campaign Against Arms Trade
 
Sadie Robinson: Don’t buy Gordon Brown’s lies on Heathrow expansion
Socialist Worker nr. 2135, jan 09 – side 6
Note: As the government approves Heathrow expansion plans, Sadie Robinson looks at the myths of job creation and “green” aviation – and how we can resist.
 
Editorial: Trevor Phillips is wrong: Police are still racist
Socialist Worker nr. 2135, jan 09 – side 12
Note: In a speech marking the tenth anniversary of the Macpherson report into the murder of black teenager Stephen Lawrence, the equalities and human rights commissioner Trevor Phillips argued that the police should no longer be accused of institutional racism.
 
Yuri Prasad: Films show a history of black unity in Britain
Socialist Worker nr. 2133, jan 09 – side 12
Note: Yuri Prasad takes a look at an inspiring series of films made in the 1980s about the struggles of black people in Britain against racism.
 
Analysis: Brown’s left bounce?
International Socialism Journal nr. 121, jan 09 – side 7
Note: The least expected beneficiary of the September-October 2008 financial crisis was Gordon Brown. The whole media, and at least half the cabinet, regarded him as one of the living dead in the run-up to the Labour Party conference. Within weeks he had been transformed into the conquering hero who knew how to deal with economic crisis not only in Britain but globally.
 
Matthew Cookson: Welfare state: Labour’s benefits plans hark back to workhouses
Socialist Worker nr. 2132, dec 08 – side 6
Note: Attacks on benefit claimants echo notions of the “undeserving poor”.
 
Ken Olende: Kenyan asylum seeker: ‘I fear for my life if I am deported’
Socialist Worker nr. 2132, dec 08 – side 6
Note: Steve, an asylum seeker living in Manchester, fears for his life if he is sent back to Kenya.
His story sheds some light on the inhumane and illogical nature of the British government’s treatment of asylum seekers.
 
New Labour’s asylum policies are cruel and unjust
Socialist Worker nr. 2132, dec 08 – side 6
Note: The cruel hypocrisy of the government’s approach to asylum was driven home last week as home secretary Jacqui Smith attempted to use the cholera outbreak in Zimbabwe to tighten asylum laws.
 
Pre-budget report: What Darling is trying to do –– and why it won’t work
Socialist Worker nr. 2129, nov 08 – side 2
Note: The Tories and the right wing press have attacked the government for allegedly reverting to its “Old Labour” tax-andspend instincts in its pre-budget report.
 
Siân Ruddick: Defend Council Housing: ‘We won’t let town die without a fight’
Socialist Worker nr. 2129, nov 08 – side 3
Note: The announcement of massive job losses at the Hoover plant in Merthyr Tydfil has sent a shockwave through South Wales. Siân Ruddick spoke to the people affected—and found burning anger at both the bosses and the government.
 
Editorial: Housing crisis: Fill the empty homes
Socialist Worker nr. 2129, nov 08 – side 12
Note: As the number of home repossessions rises, the scandal of empty homes is also increasing – there are almost 900,000 empty homes in Britain.
 
Chris Bambery: Britain lies exposed to the global economic hurricane
Socialist Worker nr. 2128, nov 08 – side 2
Note: Mervyn King, the governor of the Bank of England, admitted last week that Britain is probably now in recession. It joins a long list of economies which are now experiencing a downturn, including the US, Japan and the European Union.
In Britain there are forecasts that unemployment will hit the three million mark by 2010.
 
Chris Bambery: The bosses have their eyes on our pensions
Socialist Worker nr. 2126, nov 08 – side 4
Note: The Tory press has launched a crusade against decent pensions.We need to fight back against their plans to rob retired workers, writes Chris Bambery
 
Esme Choonara: Westfield: ‘Champagne shopping’ an insult to London poor
Socialist Worker nr. 2126, nov 08 – side 5
Note: “Soulless” and “like an airport lounge” – this was the verdict of west Londoner Katie Ducali on the new Westfield shopping centre in Shepherd’s Bush, west London. The opening of Westfield London – the largest indoor shopping centre in Europe – must be one of the most over-hyped events of the year.
 
Housing: Evictions on the rise as banks scramble for profits
Socialist Worker nr. 2126, nov 08 – side 5
Note: Hundreds of tenants in Colwyn Bay and Pensarn in north Wales and Stoke-on-Trent are facing eviction. More than 350 people had received eviction or repossession orders and been told they had to move out of the properties owned and managed by Whalley Huws.
 
Lindsey German: In my opinion: Money for the banks...
Socialist Review nr. 330, nov 08 – side 7
Note: My first thought when the government bailed out Northern Rock last year was, where the hell does it find this kind of money when there's never a spare million for a new school or hospital?
 
Siân Ruddick: Asylum seekers speak out about persecution and a life on the edge
Socialist Worker nr. 2125, nov 08 – side 6
Note: Sian Ruddick reports from Swansea on the harsh reality of existence for asylum seekers fleeing poverty and war in Gordon Brown’s Britain
 
Alex Callinicos: Build the resistance to the bosses’ crisis
Socialist Worker nr. 2119, sep 08 – side 3
Note: “There will be no ‘glad confident morning’ for free market principles for a long time to come.” So sadly conceded Samuel Brittan, one of the architects of neoliberal ideology back in the 1970s and 1980s, writing in the Financial Times on Friday of last week.
 
Owen Hatherley: Brown´s Britain: Class politics are alive and kicking in Britain
Socialist Worker nr. 2119, sep 08 – side 6
Note: Harriet Harman’s fairly unremarkable comments on class to the TUC last week – essentially saying that the class system exists – have elicited a flurry of protest from the old right.
 
Simon Basketter: Migrant workers: ‘We deserve to be treated like human beings’
Socialist Worker nr. 2117, sep 08 – side 8
Note: Migrant workers in Britain face appalling conditions – but they are starting to organise and fight back. Simon Basketter traces the links between migration, exploitation and resistance.
 
Yuri Prasad: Racism: After raids target black males, why no outcry from leaders?
Socialist Worker nr. 2117, sep 08 – side 9
Note: Picture this scene – hundreds of young black men, some appearing to be as young as 13, rounded up, surrounded and held for hours without charge by a cordon of police in body armour; parents standing outside the cordon demanding to be told what is happening to their children; dozens of officers with machine guns sealing off the area; simmering anger from those released from the cordon after being searched and finger printed.
 
Danny Dorling: Comment: Life is short – if you’re poor in Manchester
Socialist Worker nr. 2117, sep 08 – side 12
Note: New Labour policies have seen health inequality grow. Danny Dorling explains how the gaps have emerged, and how we can close them
 
Why can't energy firms pick up the bill?
Socialist Worker nr. 2116, aug 08 – side 1
Note: Demands grow for windfall tax as fuel companies rake in record profits
 
Simon Assaf + Yuri Prasad + Simon Basketter: Notting Hill Carnival crackdown targets young black men
Socialist Worker nr. 2116, aug 08 – side 3
Note: London's Notting Hill Carnival is rightly hailed as a celebration of multi-ethnic Britain. But it turned into a nightmare for hundreds of young black men as heavily armed police swooped on buses carrying them to the street party.
 
Simon Basketter: Pay revolt: Unity is needed to defend our living standards
Socialist Worker nr. 2116, aug 08 – side 5
Note: There is a growing revolt over pay in both the public and private sectors, writes Simon Basketter
 
Sadie Robinson: Thousands thrown out of work by the crisis
Socialist Worker nr. 2115, aug 08 – side 5
Note: Over the last three months, 60,000 more people in Britain have become unemployed. This massive rise takes the unemployment total to 1.67 million.
 
Alex Callinicos: What’s behind the return of Tories?
Socialist Worker nr. 2113, aug 08 – side 4
Note: “So are we all Tories now?” asked the lead article in the Observer Review last Sunday.
 
Analysis: Britain’s resurgent Tories
International Socialism Journal nr. 119, jul 08 – side 6
Note: The Tories were crowing after May’s local elections and the Crewe & Nantwich parliamentary by-election. With 44 percent of the local election vote, victory in the London mayoral election and a 17.6 percent swing away from Labour to take Crewe & Nantwich, they are convinced they will win the general election set to take place in two years time.
 
Kambiz Boomla: Privatised polyclinics
Socialist Worker nr. 2105, jun 08 – side 12
Note: The government is using a propaganda campaign against GPs to promote its unpopular polyclinic scheme.
 
Lindsey German: Is Britain moving to the right?
Socialist Review nr. 326, jun 08 – side 10
Note: Labour's crushing election defeats and the increase in the vote for the Nazi BNP has led some to believe the country is drifting rightwards. Lindsey German opens our analysis of the situation by challenging that assumption and argues that election results don't tell the whole story.
 
Judith Orr: The resistible rise of the BNP
Socialist Review nr. 326, jun 08 – side 14
Note: The recent local elections saw the BNP gain ten councillors and a London Assembly member. Judith Orr puts these results in context, and argues that the fascists can, and must, be stopped once more.
 
Glyn Robbins: Housing benefits
Socialist Review nr. 326, jun 08 – side 15
Note: The abandonment of council housing building has worsened dramatically the housing crisis, both socially and financially. Glyn Robbins argues the case for publicly-owned, democratically-run and high-quality social housing.
 
Simon Basketter: Heathrow airport's strange history of evasion and expansion
Socialist Worker nr. 2103, maj 08 – side 8
Note: The expansion of Heathrow airport is part of a plan hatched at its very inception.
 
Yuri Prasad: The rise of the right?
Socialist Worker nr. 2103, maj 08 – side 13
Note: Recent Tory election wins should not obscure the deeper political dynamics, argues Yuri Prasad
 
Cost of living is soaring
Socialist Worker nr. 2101, maj 08 – side 2
Note: Officially Britain’s rate of inflation rose to 3 percent this week. Yet the real rate of inflation for ordinary people is rising twice as fast as the official figures show.
 
Pat Carmody: Union-made: Calling for recognition
Socialist Review nr. 325, maj 08 – side 21
Note: Every night, all around the country, in the 21st century factories known as call centres, some 750,000 workers will breathe a collective sigh of relief as they get the signal that their shift has finally come to an end.
 
Sadie Robinson: Fight Back 24 April: Across Britain, workers prepare for mass strike
Socialist Worker nr. 2096, apr 08 – side 5
Note: Thursday 24 April – "Fightback Thursday" – is set to pose a serious challenge to the government, with up to half a million workers across different unions preparing to strike over pay.
 
Simon Basketter: London's working poor
Socialist Worker nr. 2096, apr 08 – side 8
Note: The capital's wealth comes at a huge cost to workers and their families, but neither New Labour nor the Tories offer any real solutions
 
Yuri Prasad: Why is the National Union of Students planning a vote to abolish itself?
Socialist Worker nr. 2094, mar 08 – side 5
Note: A key vote at next week’s annual conference of the National Union of Students (NUS) could see the organisation transformed from a campaigning body into a “professional lobbying group”.
 
Sadie Robinson: Teachers and lecturers ballot for strikes: Make 24 April a day of pay revolt
Socialist Worker nr. 2093, mar 08 – side 16
Note: Up to half a million public sector workers could strike on Thursday 24 April.
Teachers, lecturers, civil service workers and council workers could come together in a powerful blow against Gordon Brown’s public sector pay limit.
 
Ian Taylor: Frontlines: Why the price indexes miscalculate the cost of modern life
Socialist Review nr. 323, mar 08 – side 6
Note: The cost of living rose at an annual rate of 2.2 percent in January if you believe the government's Consumer Price Index (CPI). This is the rate newspapers and TV report and on which the Bank of England bases interest rate policy. But it is fiction as far as reflecting the rising prices faced by working class households.
 
Lindsey German: In My View: London mayoral elections: Race and class in the city
Socialist Review nr. 323, mar 08 – side 7
Note: Race has been an issue in London all my life.
 
Patrick Ward: London: capital's capital
Socialist Review nr. 323, mar 08 – side 22
Note: The City of London has become a tax haven for the super-rich, overseen by Gordon Brown with, alarmingly, no complaints from Mayor Ken Livingstone. Patrick Ward looks at the history and humbug that props up the square mile and leaves neighbouring boroughs cash-starved
 
Martin Smith: Culture: Big mouth...
Socialist Review nr. 321, jan 08 – side 28
Note: Once again the singer Morrissey has plenty to say about immigration and British society. In a November edition of the NME, the magazine claims that he said, "The gates of England are flooded. The country's been thrown away."
 
Gerry Mooney + Alex Law: Public sector: the new militants
Socialist Worker nr. 2082, dec 07 – side 10
Note: Gerry Mooney and Alex Law look at how New Labour’s attacks on the public sector have created a new generation of trade unionists
 
Charlie Kimber: The politics of the post strike
Socialist Review nr. 319, nov 07 – side 10
Note: The postal workers' strikes have seen 130,000 workers taking action, with picket lines in every town and city across the country. Charlie Kimber looks at the impact of the dispute and how the political fallout has led many union members to question trade union links with the Labour Party.
 
Analysis: Where will the Brown bounce land?
International Socialism Journal nr. 116, okt 07 – side 9
Note: Gordon Brown has got his honeymoon with the voters—or at least with enough of them for him to consider calling an early general election. He has not changed a single one of Tony Blair’s major policies. But the disappearance of some of the most unpopular ministerial faces has been enough to boost his poll ratings.
 
John Newsinger: Review: Campbell's blood money
International Socialism Journal nr. 116, okt 07 – side 203
Note: Alastair Campbell, The Blair Years: Extracts from Alastair Campbell Diaries (Hutchinson, 2007), £25
 
Mark Serwotka: Union-made: Raising the stakes
Socialist Review nr. 318, okt 07 – side 13
Note: The sight of Gordon Brown greeting Margaret Thatcher warmly at the door of Number 10 must have left most Labour supporters aghast.
Mark Serwotka is general secretary of the PCS, the civil service workers' trade union.
 
Brian Richardson: Interview: Stories of Black Britain in Pictures
Socialist Review nr. 318, okt 07 – side 18
Note: Author Paul Gilroy tells Brian Richardson why he hopes images of past moments of everyday life and struggle will inspire a new generation.
 
Berit Kuennecke: Ken Loach interviewed about his new film, It's a Free World
Socialist Worker nr. 2068, sep 07 – side 8
Note: Award-winning director Ken Loach spoke to Berit Kuennecke about his new film, It’s A Free World, an exposé of the exploitation of migrant workers in Britain.
 
Simon Basketter: Migrant labour: a grim reality of poor pay and insecurity
Socialist Worker nr. 2068, sep 07 – side 9
Note: “I hate white vans,” said Alek. Around 5am every day, groups of young men and women huddle on street corners in towns across Britain. There they wait for a white van or minibus.
 
Simon Basketter: Migrant labour: organising the unorganised
Socialist Worker nr. 2068, sep 07 – side 9
Note: Thousands of eastern European workers are being brutally exploited at work, according to the TUC.
 
Chris Harman: Striking back: the return of industrial action
Socialist Worker nr. 2068, sep 07 – side 13
Note: Industrial action has returned to the mainstream in recent months. Chris Harman looks at the prospects for anger and bitterness to break out into wider battles over pay.
 
Danny Dorling: Unequal Britain
Socialist Worker nr. 2061, jul 07 – side 8
Note: A new report highlights the growing gap between rich and poor in Britain. It’s a mess – and it’s getting worse, says Danny Dorling, one of the report’s authors
See PDF version for extra graphs and maps.
 
Hsiao-Hung Pai: Frontlines: Good Things Don't Come to Those Who Wait – in Chinatown
Socialist Review nr. 315, jun 07 – side 6
Note: "We don't get paid wages here," said a waiter at Chinatown's Furama Restaurant. "We only have tips of around £200 a week. The service charge goes to the employer. We don't get a penny."
 
Charlie Kimber: Britain: Livingstone—the last reformist?
International Socialism Journal nr. 113, jan 07 – side 71
Note: London’s Evening Standard newspaper recently ran the front page headline ‘Ken Backs Terrorist on the Tube’. Most of the capital’s 7 million inhabitants will have been in no doubt who ‘Ken’ was. Almost uniquely among British politicians, London Mayor Ken Livingstone has achieved the status of being recognisable from his first name alone.
 
The painful passing of Tony Blair
International Socialism Journal nr. 112, sep 06 – side 3
Note: The political crisis in the New Labour government was coming to a head as we went to press.
 
Neil Davidson: Carnival, march, riot
International Socialism Journal nr. 112, sep 06 – side 209
Note: A review of Dave Renton: "When We Touched the Sky: the Anti-Nazi League, 1977-1981" (New Clarion Press, 2006), £13.95
 
Charlie Kimber: 1.5 million workers in strike vote: Act now to save our pensions
Socialist Worker nr. 1988, feb 06 – side 1
Note: Around 1.5 million workers in the local government pension scheme (LGPS) are scheduled to start ballots next Tuesday for strikes over pensions.
 
Chris Harman: Britain after eight years of Blair
International Socialism Journal nr. 106, mar 05 – side 35
Note: What is the shape of Britain after eight years of New Labour? What has happened to industry, the working class, the schools, the urban landscape? How badly damaged is Labour's base? Jane Hardy, Jacob Middleton, Terry Wrightly, Alex Law, Gerry Mooney and Charlie Kimber provide insights into these issues in a special section.
An introduction to these 5 articles.
 
Jane Hardy: The changing structure of the British economy
International Socialism Journal nr. 106, mar 05 – side 44
Note: What is the shape of Britain after eight years of New Labour? What has happened to industry, the working class, the schools, the urban landscape? How badly damaged is Labour's base? Jane Hardy, Jacob Middleton, Terry Wrightly, Alex Law, Gerry Mooney and Charlie Kimber provide insights into these issues in a special section.
 
Jacob Middleton: The working class
International Socialism Journal nr. 106, mar 05 – side 67
Note: What is the shape of Britain after eight years of New Labour? What has happened to industry, the working class, the schools, the urban landscape? How badly damaged is Labour's base? Jane Hardy, Jacob Middleton, Terry Wrightly, Alex Law, Gerry Mooney and Charlie Kimber provide insights into these issues in a special section.
 
Terry Wrigley: Blair’s vision for education: business, business, business
International Socialism Journal nr. 106, mar 05 – side 75
Note: What is the shape of Britain after eight years of New Labour? What has happened to industry, the working class, the schools, the urban landscape? How badly damaged is Labour's base? Jane Hardy, Jacob Middleton, Terry Wrightly, Alex Law, Gerry Mooney and Charlie Kimber provide insights into these issues in a special section.
 
Alex Law + Gerry Mooney: Urban landscapes
International Socialism Journal nr. 106, mar 05 – side 89
Note: What is the shape of Britain after eight years of New Labour? What has happened to industry, the working class, the schools, the urban landscape? How badly damaged is Labour's base? Jane Hardy, Jacob Middleton, Terry Wrightly, Alex Law, Gerry Mooney and Charlie Kimber provide insights into these issues in a special section.
 
Charlie Kimber: Labour’s organic crisis
International Socialism Journal nr. 106, mar 05 – side 101
Note: What is the shape of Britain after eight years of New Labour? What has happened to industry, the working class, the schools, the urban landscape? How badly damaged is Labour's base? Jane Hardy, Jacob Middleton, Terry Wrightly, Alex Law, Gerry Mooney and Charlie Kimber provide insights into these issues in a special section.
 
ASBOS supplement: Frontpage: Asbos: what future for our kids?
Socialist Worker nr. 1930, dec 04 – side 101
Note: Content
 
Gregor Gall: Trade unions: Back from the brink or still on the margins?
International Socialism Journal nr. 105, dec 04 – side 98
Note: What are the prospects for industrial class struggle in Britain? In our new polemics section Gregor Gall argues aginst what he sees as the over-optimism of the Socialist Workers Party and Martin Smith replies.
 
Martin Smith: Trade unions: Politics and the struggle
International Socialism Journal nr. 105, dec 04 – side 111
Note: What are the prospects for industrial class struggle in Britain? In our new polemics section Gregor Gall argues aginst what he sees as the over-optimism of the Socialist Workers Party and Martin Smith replies.
 
Lindsey German: Vote 04: Putting Respect on the Map
Socialist Review nr. 287, jul 04 – side 20
Note: Mayoral candidate Lindsey German assesses the impact of the vote.
 
Peter Morgan: Vote 04: On Whose Authority?
Socialist Review nr. 287, jul 04 – side 22
Note: Peter Morgan tries to find out how well the left did in the recent elections
 
Vote 04: Respect Election Results
Socialist Review nr. 287, jul 04 – side 22
Note: Detailed results from key areas
 
Peter Iversen: Oprør mod Blair
Socialistisk Arbejderavis nr. 217, aug 03 – side 5
Note: Med den tidligere våbeninspektør David Kellys død eksploderede krisen for Tony Blair og hans New Labour-regering.
 
Mikkel Birk Jespersen: Brandfolk mod Blair
Socialistisk Arbejderavis nr. 210, dec 02 – side 4
Note: Utilfredsheden med den engelske premierminister Tony Blair og hans privatiserings- og nedskæringspolitik kulminerer nu i 52.000 brandmænds strejke for højere løn.
 
Martin Smith: The return of the rank and file?
International Socialism Journal nr. 94, mar 02 – side 49
 
John Lister: We'll fight them in the hedgerows: socialist answers to the crisis in the countryside
International Socialism Journal nr. 91, jun 01 – side 93
 
John Rees: Anti-capitalism, reformism and socialism
International Socialism Journal nr. 90, mar 01 – side 3
Note: Prospects for socialists are looking brighter than for many years. The growing anti-capitalist radicalisation across the world is having an impact in Britain, where it is fusing with discontent towards the New Labour government and beginning to refuel the industrial struggle. International Socialism editor John Rees examines the effect of the anti-capitalist movement, the crisis of reformism and the state of industrial struggle. Anticipating a revival in struggle, he calls for a vital reorientation of socialist activity in an article intended as a rallying call for a new interventionism.
 
Storbritannien: Modstand mod studieafgift
Socialistisk Arbejderavis nr. 170, nov 97 – side 2
Note: Den socialdemokratiske regering i England har barslet med et forslag om undervisningsafgift på universiteter og andre højere læreanstalter.
 
Ole Mølholm Jensen: Parlamentsvalg i England og Frankrig: Chok for Europas magthavere
Socialistisk Arbejderavis nr. 161, jun 97 – side 4
Note: De seneste parlamentsvalg i England og Frankrig har sendt chokbølger gennem det europæiske borgerskab.
 
Judy Cox: How to make the Tories disappear (David Butler, Andrew Adonis & Tony Travers: "Failure in British Government-the Politics of the Poll Tax" + Paul Whiteley, Patrick Seyd & Jeremy Richardson: "True Blues -the Politics of Conservative Party Membership")
International Socialism Journal nr. 66, mar 95 – side 119
Note: Judy Cox examines the withering of Tory party membership.
 
Tom Christiansen: Storbritannien: Sejr til britiske arbejdere
Socialistisk Arbejderavis nr. 108, okt 94 – side 6
Note: Britiske jernbanearbejdere har vundet en vigtig sejr, men de kunne have vundet meget mere.
 
Ole Mølholm Jensen: Europa i oprør: Storbritannien/Tyskland: Studerende i aktion
Socialistisk Arbejderavis nr. 100, feb 94 – side 6
Note: I England fortsætter de studerende med at kæmpe mod forringelser af deres studiestøtte. Den konservative regering vil skære støtten ned med 10% om året over de næste 3 år. Forslaget blev vedtaget i underhuset i januar måned.
 
Conor Kostick: Black struggles and socialism (A Sivanandan: "Communities of Resistance")
International Socialism Journal nr. 53, dec 91 – side 103
 
Lindsey German: The last days of Thatcher?
International Socialism Journal nr. 48, sep 90 – side 3
Note: Margaret Thatcher, warmonger, breaker of unions, destroyer of public services, friend of the rich and enemy of the poor seems to have been the international success story of the 1980s.
Yet as the 1990s begin defeat seems to be staring Thatcher in the face. The economy, the showpiece and basis of Tory strategy, is sliding into recession. There is public outcry over the condition of the health and education services. And the massive movement against the poll tax has already provoked one of the largest riots that central London has ever seen. So, asks Lindsey German, are these the last days of Thatcher?
 
Sue Clegg: Thatcher and the welfare state
International Socialism Journal nr. 44, sep 89 – side 59
Note: Britain’s Tory government claims to have rolled back what its leader, Margaret Thatcher, calls the ‘nanny state’. Sue Clegg shows that the real record is much less clear cut. By analysing the gap between the Tories’ rhetoric and their actions, she explains how welfare spending results both from the needs of the capitalist class and the struggle of the working class.
 
Alex Callinicos: End of a hard reign? (Britain)
Socialist Review nr. 120, maj 89 – side 13
Note: To many commentators, ten years of Thatcher have seen far-reaching changes in British economic, political and social life, conforming to a right wing blueprint of market forces and the strong state. Alex Callinicos here argues that, in fact, despite Thatcher's luck, opportunism and a feeble opposition her policies have left Britain fundamentally unchanged.
 
Paul Foot: Can Labour win?
Socialist Review nr. 118, mar 89 – side 16
Note: Can Kinnock copy Mitterand?
 
Tony Cliff: Dark clouds and silver linings
Socialist Review nr. 113, okt 88 – side 10
Note: As the Tory attacks become more generalised a new mood of hostility towards Thatcher is growing among workers. A number of recent disputes suggests a growth in the confidence of workers. Tony Cliff, a leading member of the Socialist Workers Party, analysed these events at a recent national committee of the Party.
Here we reprint extracts from his speech.
 
Karin Sundtoft: Klassekampsopsvinget i England
Socialistisk Arbejderavis nr. 38, mar 88 – side 5
Note: Konservativ lønpolitik sprængt – Kamp for sundheden – Fælles kamp
 
Peter Green: British capitalism and the Thatcher years
International Socialism Journal nr. 35, jun 87 – side 3
 
Chris Harman: The working class after the recession
International Socialism Journal nr. 33, sep 86 – side 3
Note: One of the myths feeding the policies of Labour Party leader Neil Kinnock and his supporters has been that of the ‘decline’ of the working class, or at least of the organised working class. (This article was later published in the book "The Changing Working Class".)
Alt. url: Marxists Internet Archive (MIA)
 
John Palmer: Reply to Nigel Harris on the GLC's industrial strategy
International Socialism Journal nr. 33, sep 86 – side 134
 
Gerner Kristensen: Wapping: Aktion eller ...
Socialistisk Arbejderavis nr. 20, jun 86 – side 2
Note: I England fortsætter kampen mod bladkongen Rupert Murdochs elektrikerbefængte avistrykkeri i Wapping. Her produceres aviserne The Sun og The Times af 500 skruebrækkere fra elektrikerforbundet. Murdoch fyrede i januar 6.000 grafiske arbejdere på den konto.
 
Andy Zebrowski: A note on ‘Thatcherism’
International Socialism Journal nr. 32, jun 86 – side 151
 
Nigel Harris: What to do with London? The strategies of the GLC 1981-86
International Socialism Journal nr. 31, mar 86 – side 113
 
Karin Ladefoged: Liverpool: Jagt på socialister
Socialistisk Arbejderavis nr. 16, jan 86 – side 8
Note: I de sidste to et halvt år har Liverpools Labour-dominerede byråd været centrum for alle, der har villet bekæmpe Thatchers politik via lokale byråd.
 
Chris Harman: 1984 and the shape of things to come
International Socialism Journal nr. 29, jun 85 – side 62
Note: The class struggle and the left in the aftermath of the miners defeat
Alt. url: Chris Harman’s Back Pages
 
Mike Simons + Alex Callinicos: The Great Strike: The miners’ strike of 1984-5 and its lessons
International Socialism Journal nr. 27-28, mar 85 – side 7
Note: Introduction – 7
1. The strike begins – 10
2. Towards confrontation – 18
3. The tragedy of Nottinghamshire – 47
4. Orgreave and the battle for steel – 82
5. Solidarity and bureaucracy – 120
6. Communities under siege – 159
7. The unnecessary defeat – 197
8. What went wrong? – 230
 
Dave Beecham: How far has rank and file organisation been weakened and incorporated? (W Daniel & N Milward: "Workplace Relations in Britain")
International Socialism Journal nr. 23, mar 84 – side 99
 
Anne Beezer + Martin Barker: The language of racism – an examination of Lord Scarman's Report on the Brixton riots
International Socialism Journal nr. 18, dec 82 – side 108
 
Alex Callinicos: The Rank-and-File Movement today
International Socialism Journal nr. 17, sep 82 – side 1
Note: Perhaps the most well-known characteristic of the Socialist Workers Party within the British labour movement has been its advocacy of a national rank-and-file movement. Indeed, our reformist critics have often belaboured us for having our own special deviation, ‘rank and filism’.
 
Stuart Axe: A second year of falling wages
Socialist Review nr. 40, feb 82 – side 2
Note: Last summer the government and the CBI launched a campaign to persuade workers to accept pay increases of less than five per cent through this winter and the rest of 1982.
 
Chris Harman: The summer of 1981: a post-riot analysis
International Socialism Journal nr. 14, sep 81 – side 1
Note: The most violent and extensive disturbances on Britain’s streets since the war. That was the press’s verdict on the week of July 3rd-11th. And for once the press was right. The barricade, the overturned police van, the milk floats driven at police lines, the burnt out cars and pubs and the looted hi-fi shops – all were something new on the streets of Britain. Above all, the novelty was symbolised in the cascades of petrol bombs. The weapon of Budapest ’56 and Watts ’65, of Paris ’68 and Derry ’69 was now the weapon of Brixton and Southall, of Toxteth and Moss Side.
 
Dave Beecham: Updating the downturn: the class struggle under the Tories
International Socialism Journal nr. 14, sep 81 – side 44
Note: Just over two years of Tory government have passed in a blur of events. As this article was being written British Airways declared it would make 9,000 workers redundant, and freeze pay for a year after already delaying previous increases by three months; Hoover announced a threat to cut pay by 10% in January 1982; the rail union leaders – from a position of strength – abandoned their strike plans and agreed to a potentially savage assault on jobs through productivity deals; and the 750 workers at Lawrence Scotts in Manchester were still trying to win one of the few fights for jobs in engineering, in the face of total treachery from the officials of their unions, left and right. On 15 September 1981 the new right-wing Tory cabinet took its toughest line on pay, announcing virtually a 4% limit in the public services.
 
Peter Green: ‘Alternative’ and ‘Socialist’ Economic Strategies
International Socialism Journal nr. 13, jun 81 – side 90
Note: A review article of A. Glyn & J. Harrison, The British Economic Disaster (Pluto Press, London 1980, £2.95); and CSE London Working Group, The Alternative Economic Strategy (CSE Books, London 1980, £2.50)
The two books under review have been well timed. Having barely recovered from the slump of 1974–75, British capitalism is now in the throes of an even more abrupt decline.
 
Tony Cliff: The balance of class forces in Britain today
International Socialism Journal nr. 6, sep 79 – side 1
Note: A major reassessment of the class struggle in the light of the experience of the last five years.
This article is an excerpt from a forthcoming book entitled "The Employers' Offensive and the Fight Back".
 
Steve Jefferys: Striking into the 1980s modern British trade unionism: its limit and potential
International Socialism Journal nr. 5, jun 79 – side 1
Note: By the end of 1974 the full effects of the world oil and currency crises and the related commodity speculation put the survival of British capital in anything like its 1960s condition into question. It was forced to act. Just two and half years later all the gains in workers’ real wages made between 1970 and 1974 had been wiped out; the social wage (public services and amenities) had been cut by a quarter.
 
Storbritannien Labour
Charlie Kimber: Brev til en Jeremy Corbyn-tilhænger
Socialistisk Arbejderavis nr. 354, okt 16 – side 10
Note: Charlie Kimber advarer om, at fred med den ondsindede højrefløj i Labour ikke er mulig – og at afgørende kampe uden for partiet risikerer at blive ignoreret.
 
Mark Thomas: A house divided: Jeremy Corbyn and the Labour Party
International Socialism Journal nr. 149, jan 16 – side 39
Note: Something remarkable happened over the summer of 2015. Immediately after Ed Miliband resigned following Labour’s defeat in the general election, the grip exercised by Blairism over the Labour Party had seemed set to continue grimly on. The field competing for the Labour leadership was confined to various shades of uninspiring Blairites, with the supposedly “left” candidate, Andy Burnham, rushing to distance himself from the unions. Even after Jeremy Corbyn threw his hat in the ring, most (including Corbyn himself) assumed he would be soundly beaten.
 
Alex Callinicos: Analysis: Two faces of reformism
International Socialism Journal nr. 148, okt 15 – side 3
Note: In our last issue we advised the radical left in Britain to be “open to the sudden fissures that the crisis of the British state can…unexpectedly open up, perhaps making possible a qualitative advance”. And the unexpected came very quickly, and in a particularly surprising form.
 
Julie Sherry: Can Len McCluskey reclaim Labour?
International Socialism Journal nr. 140, okt 13 – side 43
Note: With over 1.4 million members, Unite is Britain’s biggest union, representing more than a fifth of all trade unionists in the UK. A mainly private sector union, it is also well represented in parts of the public sector—local government, the health service, the Ministry of Defence and other government departments.
 
Simon Basketter: What do unions get for giving money to Labour?
Socialist Worker nr. 2362, jul 13 – side 17
Note: Simon Basketter looks at why Ed Miliband is trying to cut union members’ automatic subs to Labour—and why union leaders continue to fund the party.
 
Simon Basketter: Ed Miliband moves to weaken unions’ influence on Labour
Socialist Worker nr. 2361, jul 13 – side 7
Note: A bruising week of confrontations, accusations, attacks and withdrawals has exposed the Labour Party’s love-hate relationship with the big trade unions, writes Simon Basketter.
 
Simon Basketter: Trade unions still provide the finance for Labour
Socialist Worker nr. 2361, jul 13 – side 7
Note: We should defend the right of unions to fund political parties. But if Labour wants to get workers’ money it should do something to deserve it, writes Simon Basketter.
 
Alex Callinicos: Labour ‘me-tooing’ helps Tory offensive
Socialist Worker nr. 2360, jul 13 – side 6
Note: The comprehensive spending review revealed what a nasty, vicious bunch of class warriors the coalition is. But it also exposed the sheer spinelessness of the Labour Party under Ed Miliband.
 
Iain Ferguson: Labour’s surrender to austerity
Socialist Review nr. 382, jul 13 – side 10
Note: In June Ed Miliband and Ed Balls signalled that a future Labour government will accept the framework of the Tories’ austerity plans and put a cap on welfare spending. Iain Ferguson looks at Labour’s shift to the right and challenges the myths about the welfare state used to justify this turn.
 
Alex Callinicos: Groundhog day as Labour backs cuts
Socialist Worker nr. 2357, jun 13 – side 6
Note: One might say that the historical role of Labour leaders is to disappoint their supporters. The fundamental contradiction of Labourism lies between its promise to make the world a better place and its commitment in government to managing capitalism efficiently.
 
Eastleigh: Labour failed to win more votes than in 2010
Socialist Worker nr. 2343, mar 13 – side 6
Note: Labour came fourth in the by-election with a vote that barely changed from the 2010 general election. Instead of realising that moving to the right doesn’t help them they look set to draw the opposite conclusion.
 
Simon Basketter: From New Labour to Blue Labour
Socialist Worker nr. 2253, maj 11 – side 10
Note: As Labour leader Ed Miliband decides to hitch a ride on the ‘Blue Labour’ bandwagon, Simon Basketter looks at how conservative ideas are sweeping the party.
 
Simon Basketter: Debates in the Movement: Rebranding is no cure for Labour’s blues
Socialist Worker nr. 2250, maj 11 – side 13
Note: Simon Basketter takes issue with the idea that Labour can win by shifting further to the right.
 
Amy Leather: Labour's Pains
Socialist Review nr. 355, feb 11 – side 4
Note: The shock resignation of Alan Johnson as Labour's shadow chancellor and the appointment of Ed Balls to the post has brought to the fore Labour's internal tensions over its direction and strategy.
 
Paul Blackledge: Labourism and socialism: Ralph Miliband’s Marxism
International Socialism Journal nr. 129, jan 11 – side 67
Note: It is more than a little ironic that the recent race for the leadership of the Labour Party came down to a contest between the Miliband brothers. For their dad, Ralph, was the author of a devastating socialist critique of the Labour Party, Parliamentary Socialism.
 
John Newsinger: True crime stories: some New Labour memoirs
International Socialism Journal nr. 129, jan 11 – side 97
Note: A review of John Prescott with Hunter Davies, Prezza: Pulling No Punches (Headline, 2008), £18.99; Peter Mandelson, The Third Man: Life At The Heart Of New Labour (Harper Press, 2010), £25; Tony Blair, A Journey (Hutchinson, 2010), £25.
 
Alex Callinicos: Michael Foot’s nationalist spirit still lives on
Socialist Worker nr. 2192, mar 10 – side 4
Note: The hypocrisy of the British media can still surprise. Look at the warmth with which they bade farewell to Michael Foot when he died last week, after they had vilified him while he was leader of the Labour Party between 1980 and 1983.
 
Debate: Should socialists call for a Labour vote?
Socialist Review nr. 345, mar 10 – side 8
Note: Socialist Review readers respond to the debate over voting Labour at the general election.
 
Failed coup shows crisis at the heart of government
Socialist Worker nr. 2184, jan 10 – side 2
Note: Labour is in chaos. The Brownite and Blairite wings of the party are still at each others’ throats as their election strategy collapses in slow motion.
The third failed coup against Gordon Brown fizzled out last week – but it revealed divisions that go to the heart of the Labour government.
 
Michael Lavalette: Labour’s welfare plans far from radical
Socialist Worker nr. 2180, dec 09 – side 12
Note: Over the last few weeks both Labour and the Tories have announced plans to restructure education, health and social services after next year’s election.
 
Shaun Doherty: Labour's last throw of the dice
Socialist Review nr. 342, dec 09 – side 6
Note: Commentators in the Guardian were left clutching at straws in the wake of the queen's speech outlining the government's legislative programme in the run up to the general election.
 
Anthony Shaw: Has the Labour left lost its Compass?
Socialist Worker nr. 2156, jun 09 – side 4
Note: New Labour’s devastation in the European and county council elections has led some commentators to speculate whether the party is finished as a political force in Britain.
 
Alex Callinicos: Challenges facing Gordon Brown’s bounce
Socialist Worker nr. 2127, nov 08 – side 4
Note: The surest thing to emerge from Labour’s surprise victory last week in the Glenrothes by-election is that Alex Salmond doesn’t walk on water any more. The leader of the Scottish National Party (SNP) and first minister of Scotland has dominated politics north of the border for the past few years.
 
Labour is still cosying up to the ultra-rich
Socialist Worker nr. 2125, nov 08 – side 4
Note: Gordon Brown’s latest answer to the recession is to spend his way out of it. Having defended the dogma of the free market for the past ten years, he has now shifted to talk of state intervention and Keynesian economics. This has led some to celebrate Labour’s “shift to the left”. But in reality there are massive limitations to the government’s position, alongside a nasty agenda of attacks on working class people.
 
Chris Bambery: Gordon Brown reassures the rich that he’s still on their side
Socialist Worker nr. 2120, sep 08 – side 2
Note: Despite the economic turmoil unleashed by the banks last week, Gordon Brown has signaled that New Labour’s love affair with finance and big business will continue.
 
Will the crisis lead to the rebirth of the Labour left?
Socialist Worker nr. 2120, sep 08 – side 2
Note: Some in the Labour Party believe that the economic crisis will herald a revival of the party’s left wing.
Neal Lawson, of the centre-left Compass think-tank, told a fringe meeting at this week’s conference that the era of free markets could be over, effective management of capitalism was on the agenda and the crisis has given Labour a lifeline.
 
Labour conference: Policies and personalities are linked
Socialist Worker nr. 2120, sep 08 – side 2
Note: The phrase “We should be talking about policies not personalities,” has become the mantra of Labour left wingers when questioned on Gordon Brown’s leadership.
 
Sadie Robinson: Labour conference: New Labour whitewash at the party fringe
Socialist Worker nr. 2120, sep 08 – side 2
Note: You wouldn’t have known that both the Labour Party and the economy faced serious problems from some of the fringe meetings at the conference.
 
Chris Bambery: Labour sinks into mess of its own making
Socialist Worker nr. 2119, sep 08 – side 2
Note: Labour goes into its annual conference this week mired in a civil war over whether Gordon Brown will remain as leader. So called “loyalists” have joined key supporters of former prime minister, Tony Blair, in demanding Brown face a leadership election.
 
Alex Callinicos: Ideology behind Gordon Brown’s ‘death wish’
Socialist Worker nr. 2118, sep 08 – side 4
Note: Has there ever been a government with as great a death wish as this one? You would have thought Gordon Brown had a sufficient sense of self-preservation to realise that the only people more unpopular than him are the bosses of the big energy companies. What better way to start rebuilding his government’s popularity than to hit them with a windfall tax?
 
Sadie Robinson: Labour in turmoil as recession looms
Socialist Worker nr. 2117, sep 08 – side 16
Note: New Labour has finally admitted what millions have known for months – that the country is sailing towards recession and government ministers have no solution to the crisis.
 
James Barr: Labour: A change in direction is not on the table
Socialist Worker nr. 2113, aug 08 – side 4
Note: Labour’s leaders are tearing the party apart as they flail around in desperation, but we should have no sympathy, writes James Barr
 
Editorial: Labour’s tumbling membership: thousands have lost their political home
Socialist Worker nr. 2113, aug 08 – side 12
Note: New Labour admitted in a submission to the Electoral Commission that, at the end of last year, its official membership was 176,891 – the lowest figure since 1900.
 
Simon Basketter: Gordon Brown is in a hole but keeps digging
Socialist Worker nr. 2112, aug 08 – side 3
Note: For many people the one thing Gordon Brown had going for him was that he wasn’t Tony Blair. But in less than a year Brown has managed to make himself more unpopular than Blair, both inside and outside the Labour Party.
 
Charlie Kimber: Analysis: Livingstone pays the price for "triangulation"
International Socialism Journal nr. 119, jul 08 – side 29
Note: In broad terms the story is easily told. Labour’s Ken Livingstone was defeated as Mayor of London by Conservative Boris Johnson because the Labour Party is on the slide and the right in British politics has got its act together.
 
Matthew Cookson: Labour in crisis: The rise and fall of Tony Benn and the 1980s Labour left
Socialist Worker nr. 2105, jun 08 – side 6
Note: In last in our series, Matthew Cookson looks at the struggles that led to the birth of New Labour
 
Simon Basketter: GMB union cuts Labour funding
Socialist Worker nr. 2105, jun 08 – side 16
Note: The GMB, one of Britain’s largest unions, is to withdraw sponsorship from a third of the 108 Labour MPs it backs because they are not implementing union policies.
 
Yuri Prasad: CWU conference debates political relationship with Labour
Socialist Worker nr. 2105, jun 08 – side 16
Note: The Communication Workers Union (CWU) conference was set to discuss its political fund as Socialist Worker went to press. Debate about the relationship between the union and the Labour Party has raged since last year’s national post strike.
 
Matthew Cookson: Labour in crisis: Nye Bevan’s capitulation and the left’s defeat
Socialist Worker nr. 2104, jun 08 – side 6
Note: In the second part of our series Matthew Cookson looks at the battle in the Labour Party in the 1950s.
 
Huw Williams: Peter Hain’s aspirations for Wales
Socialist Worker nr. 2104, jun 08 – side 12
Note: Former minister Peter Hain has argued that Welsh Labour must move to the right, but his analysis is way off the mark.
 
Matthew Cookson: Labour in crisis: Labour’s ‘Great betrayal’ led to the brink of collapse
Socialist Worker nr. 2103, maj 08 – side 6
Note: In the first part of our new series on past crises in the Labour Party Matthew Cookson looks at the party’s response to the 1930s.
 
Alex Callinicos: Ken Livingstone: the loser’s illusion that he’s a winner
Socialist Worker nr. 2101, maj 08 – side 4
Note: Reading Ken Livingstone in the Guardian on Friday of last week, I almost convinced myself that 1 May had been a bad dream and that Boris Johnson hadn’t been elected mayor of London.
 
John Newsinger: When old Labour went to war
International Socialism Journal nr. 118, apr 08 – side 113
Note: A review of Mark Phythian, The Labour Party, War and International Relations 1945-2006 (Routledge, 2007), £19.99
One response to the Iraq war has been an attempt to blame it on Tony Blair personally and to somehow exonerate the Labour Party.
 
Labour is no longer our party after Remploy betrayal, say union officials
Socialist Worker nr. 2091, mar 08 – side 2
Note: Five senior GMB union officials have resigned from the Labour Party over the “despicable betrayal” of disabled workers at Remploy factories, who are facing redundancy.
 
Analysis: The misery of New Labour
International Socialism Journal nr. 117, jan 08 – side 3
Note: The Brown bounce has become the Brown belly flop—and one into an ever stormier ocean. The immediate source of New Labour’s misery is obvious. Those who live by the image die by the image. Nothing distinguishes Labour’s post-Thatcherite programme for making capital happy from that of David Cameron’s Tories.
 
John Newsinger: Gordon Brown: From Reformism to Neoliberalism
International Socialism Journal nr. 115, jul 07 – side 35
Note: “The distribution of income in Britain has now become so unequal that it is beginning to resemble a Third World country”, wrote Gordon Brown in his 1989 indictment of Thatcherism, Where There Is Greed.
 
Chris Harman: Gordon Brown: The economic "record"
International Socialism Journal nr. 115, jul 07 – side 57
Note: As Tony Blair departed and Gordon Brown prepared to take over as prime minister one great myth was boomed out by New Labour’s propaganda machine—that Brown had achieved a “miracle” for the British economy.
 
Lindsey German: In my view: Brown In, Troops Out?
Socialist Review nr. 315, jun 07 – side 6
Note: Will Gordon Brown pull the troops out of Iraq? He'd be a fool if he didn't try.
 
Michael Bradley + Judith Orr: Can Things Only Get Better?
Socialist Review nr. 315, jun 07 – side 14
Note: The decision by Labour MPs to deny party members the chance to choose their new leader means Gordon Brown will take office at the end of June. Judith Orr looks at the problems he will face and the state of the Labour left, while Michael Bradley examines the response from the unions.
 
John Newsinger: Wet Blunkett
International Socialism Journal nr. 113, jan 07 – side 179
Note: A review of David Blunkett, The Blunkett Tapes (Bloomsbury, 2006), £25
With the publication of his supposed ‘diaries’, David Blunkett has achieved an impressive hat-trick: the former heads of the Metropolitan Police, the Prison Service and the Armed Forces have all publicly called him a liar. This is a remarkable achievement for any former home secretary, let alone one as right wing as Blunkett. Indeed nothing like it has ever happened before.
 
Analysis: New Labour’s meltdown?
International Socialism Journal nr. 111, jun 06 – side 6
Note: The New York Times did not, for some reason, count New Labour in Britain as among its weak European governments. It ought to have done.
 
Editorial: Off to a Flying Start
Socialist Review nr. 287, jul 04 – side 5
Note: Problems for New Labour in the elections and Iraq.
 
Alex Callinicos: Comment: Divisions are hitting home
Socialist Worker nr. 1817, sep 02 – side 4
Note: Alex Callinicos writes on the unrest in the Labour Party over war against Iraq
 
Paul Foot: Obituary: Red Barbara's rocky road (Barbara Castle)
Socialist Review nr. 264, jun 02 – side 17
 
Mike Marqusee: Labour's long march to the right
International Socialism Journal nr. 91, jun 01 – side 31
Note: The Breakdown of the Labour Party's base is continuing apace, while the Socialist Alliance/SSP challenge is breaking new ground in British politics. Author and Socialist Alliance national committee member Mike Marqusee responds to John Rees's analysis in International Socialism 90 of how and why this is happening, and adds his voice to the discussion of how we build a new left here in Britain.
 
Brian Richardson + Ed Mynott + Gerry Mooney + Michael Lavalette + Karen Evans: The woeful record of the House of Blair
International Socialism Journal nr. 90, mar 01 – side 77
Note: Labour's election platform seems to be even more right wing than the manifesto on which it fought the 1997 election. In a special briefing International Socialism has brought together a number of writers who provide a clear digest of what Labour has said and done in key policy areas such as education, poverty and racism.
 
Hazel Croft: Probing questions from East London Labour: Blair's march is out of step
Socialist Worker nr. 1675, dec 99 
Note: TONY BLAIR got a taste of the discontent and debate inside the Labour Party when he spoke in east London last week. Blair and deputy prime minister John Prescott conducted a question and answer session at Queen Mary & Westfield College.
 
Martin Smith: As Blair attacks Ken Livingstone's record: Why did Labour lose in 1980s?
Socialist Worker nr. 1675, dec 99 
Note: "WHEN KEN Livingstone was in charge of the Labour Party in London we were a byword for extremism. We were unelectable as a political party. I never want to go back to those days again." This is Tony Blair's central argument why people should not back Ken Livingstone as Labour's candidate for mayor of London. It is a complete reversal of the truth.
 
Michael Lavalette + Gerry Mooney: New Labour, new moralism: the welfare politics and ideology of New Labour under Blair
International Socialism Journal nr. 85, dec 99 – side 27
Note: The signs of the unpopularity of Blairism internationally can also be read in its country of origin, as the elections to the Scottish Parliament and the Welsh Assembly demonstrated. Michael Lavalette and Gerry Mooney's analysis of the ideology of New Labour shows how deeply anti working class, pro-market sentiment has penetrated the Labour leadership.
 
Lindsey German: The Blair project cracks
International Socialism Journal nr. 82, mar 99 – side 3
Note: The unravelling of Tony Blair's government has accelerated since he lost his key adviser Peter Mandelson in a sleaze scandal late last year. Since then the crisis in the Labour Party in Wales and in Scotland, followed by the news that Ken Livingstone will challenge Blairite attempts to exclude him as the Labour candidate for London mayor, have made it clear that the deep dissatisfaction with New Labour is finding expression within the party itself. And all this comes before the worst of the recession hits the British economy and before the government faces widespread industrial struggle. Lindsey German charts the decline in Blair's fortunes and outlines a socialist alternative to New Labour.
 
Megan Trudell: New Labour, old conflicts: the story so far
International Socialism Journal nr. 79, jun 98 – side 71
Note: Reviews: D Draper: "Blair's Hundred Days"; D Butler and D Kavanagh: "The British General Election of 1997"; P Anderson and N Mann: "Safety First: The Making of New Labour"; L Panitch and C Leys: "The End of Parliamentary Socialism: From New Left to New Labour"
 
Labours kongres: Blair under pres fra neden
Socialistisk Arbejderavis nr. 168, okt 97 – side 2
Note: Den engelske premierminister, Tony Blair, er netop blevet hyldet som en konge på sit partis, Labours, kongres. Hans store popularitet må være enhver socialdemokrats ønskedrøm.
 
John Rees: The class struggle under New Labour
International Socialism Journal nr. 75, jun 97 – side 3
Note: Labour's landslide election victory was a product of a previous leftward shift in working class consciousness dating from at least the anti poll tax rebellion. Labour's leaders and many on the left were surprised by the class vote for Labour precisely because this ideological watershed went unnoticed. The effect of Labour's victory has been to deepen the mood of resistance in the working class and to open new possibilities for socialist organisation. In an extended editorial, John Rees examines the economic prospects the new government faces, the faultlines in its policy, and maps out the socialist project in the coming period.
 
Alex Callinicos: Betrayal and discontent: Labour under Blair
International Socialism Journal nr. 72, sep 96 – side 3
Note: Tony Blair's march to the right in double quick time has provoked unprecedented pre-election discontent, and not just among the party's rank and file. Alex Callinicos examines all the most recent policy shifts, concentrating on Labour's economic programme. He concludes that although Blair once identified with the kind of revived Keynsianism typified by Will Hutton's bestseller "The State We're In". He is now aligned more closely with the most naked forms of capitalist accumulation.
 
Paul Foot: When will the Blair bubble burst?
International Socialism Journal nr. 67, jun 95 – side 3
Note: Millions of people are turning to Tony Blair's 'New Labour'. Award winning journalist Paul Foot looks at the reasons for Blair's popularity and the prospects for class struggle under a future Labour government. In 'When will the Blair bubble burst?' he examines the limits of Blair's popularity, the economic and political boundaries within which he is imprisoned and outlines an alternative socialist strategy.
 
Alex Callinicos: Backward to liberalism (David Miliband, ed.: "Reinventing the Left")
International Socialism Journal nr. 66, mar 95 – side 77
Note: British politics is dominated by the rightward shift of Tony Blair's `new look' Labour Party and the continued crisis of the Tory government. Alex Callinicos reviews the poverty of the Labour modernisers' thought.
 
Tony Cliff + Donny Gluckstein: The anatomy of reformism (Tony Cliff & Donny Gluckstein: "The Labour Party – a Marxist History")
International Socialism Journal nr. 42, mar 89 – side 143
Note: Phil Taylor reviews Tony Cliff and Donny Gluckstein's recent history of the Labour Party.
 
John Molyneux: Labour laid bare (Tony Cliff & Donny Gluckstein: "The Labour Party – A Marxist analysis")
Socialist Review nr. 113, okt 88 – side 24
 
Chanie Rosenberg: Labour and the fight against fascism
International Socialism Journal nr. 39, jun 88 – side 55
Note: The rise of the National Front in France is grim testimony to the failures of socialist Francois Mitterrand’s Presidency. But it is not the first time that a reformist government has allowed fascists to grow. The last Labour government in Britain did the same.
This has meant that the initiative in confronting the fascists has always had to come from those to the left of the reformists. In a timely article Chanie Rosenberg recalls not just the fight against the National Front in the 1970s and the struggle against Mosley in the 1930s, but also analyses the response of the French left to the rise of Le Pen.
 
Donny Gluckstein: Keir Hardie – 'the man who made the Labour Party'
International Socialism Journal nr. 32, jun 86 – side 45
 
Gareth Jenkins: Where is the Labour Party heading?
International Socialism Journal nr. 30, sep 85 – side 3
 
Duncan Hallas: Revolutionaries and the Labour Party
International Socialism Journal nr. 16, mar 82 – side 1
Note: The aim of this article is a modest one. It is to clarify the attitudes revolutionaries have taken towards the Labour Party, to review the experience and to assess the situation of today. In particular, the problem of what is called entrism – revolutionary organisations operating inside the Labour Party – is considered in some detail.
 
Ray Challinor: Book Review: The Labour Party
International Socialism Journal (1st series) nr. 79, jun 75 – side 39
Note: David Coates: The Labour Party and the Struggle for Socialism, Cambridge, £5.00 hardback, £2.00 paperback.
Ross McKibbin: The Evolution of the Labour Party 1910-1924, Oxford, £5.75.
 
Notes of the Quarter: 1. The Young Socialists
International Socialism Journal (1st series) nr. 9, jun 62 – side 2
Note: It is ironical that May Day – the day of solidarity demonstrations of the Labour movement – should this year appear to have heralded the organized smashing of the Left wing in the Labour Party.
 
Notes of the Quarter: 2. INDEC
International Socialism Journal (1st series) nr. 9, jun 62 – side 2
Note: Each political victory of the Labour Party leadership increases the pressure for the Left to disintegrate. At each blow, some grow tired and drop off – whether into gardening, the cosy security of sectarianism or the brief hope of alternative minor political parties.
 
Tony Cliff: The Labour Party in Perspective
International Socialism Journal (1st series) nr. 9, jun 62 
Note: The aim of the present article is to try and discover what makes the Labour Party tick. The British Labour Party is unique among social democratic parties in its structure and embraces a number of contradictory phenomena. It has a membership of millions of workers throughout the country, and the allegiance of further millions – it is thus a mass party. At the same time it involves actively only a tiny minority of its supporters.
 
Notes of the Quarter: 2. Labour’s Sickness
International Socialism Journal (1st series) nr. 7, dec 61 – side 3
Note: ‘Gaitskell must go’ was among the most foolish slogans ever shouted on the left, and not just because it suggested support for Mr Wilson or for Mr Brown as Leader of the party. Much worse, it suggested that the crisis in the Labour Party was a crisis of leadership.
 
Notes of the Quarter: 1. Labour’s Suicide Bid
International Socialism Journal (1st series) nr. 6, sep 61 – side 2
Note: The 1961 Labour Party conference is likely to be an historic occasion. It will not seem like one. To both Left and Right it will appear to mark just another stage in internal faction fighting.
 
Storbritannien fagforeninger
Ralph Darlington: Official and unofficial action in the fight against anti-union laws
International Socialism Journal nr. 151, jul 16 – side 37
Note: The Conservative government’s Trade Union Act 2016—in particular the strike balloting threshold provisions—represents the most radical tightening of the rules on industrial action and trade union organisation since the Margaret Thatcher era of the 1980s.
 
Mark O’Brien: Revolutionaries in the unions: The reality of the strike
International Socialism Journal nr. 147, jul 15 – side 151
Note: The debate around orientations for revolutionaries in the unions today is the result of an uncomfortable but inescapable fact: the level of trade union struggle has remained historically low for 20 years.
 
Dave Lyddon: Bureaucratic mass strikes: A response to Mark O’Brien
International Socialism Journal nr. 146, apr 15 – side 145
Note: The mass strike of 30 November 2011 (N30) was the broadest and biggest ever British public sector strike and involved the largest number of women workers in any British strike. It has been discussed several times in this journal, with Mark O’Brien giving a particularly useful account of local organisation around N30, but my response will comment on some of his other points.
 
Martin Upchurch: The end of the “safe space” for unions? A response to Simon Joyce
International Socialism Journal nr. 146, apr 15 – side 189
Note: Simon Joyce has written a welcome article that seeks to address why Britain’s strike record is at a historically low level. Simon’s argument is that the “confidence theory” of strike action, associated with the International Socialist tradition, is insufficient to explain contemporary labour quiescence.
 
Donny Gluckstein: The question of confidence: A reply to Simon Joyce
International Socialism Journal nr. 146, apr 15 – side 203
Note: Simon Joyce’s piece “Why are there so few strikes?” in International Socialism 145 is very welcome. It asks an essential question, and Joyce clearly achieves his aim of opening a discussion.
 
Simon Joyce: Why are there so few strikes?
International Socialism Journal nr. 145, jan 15 – side 119
Note: This article addresses a key issue for socialists: the current low level of strikes.
 
Jack Robertson: Review: Before and after post-Fordism
International Socialism Journal nr. 142, apr 14 – side 203
Note: Sheila Cohen, Notoriously Militant: The Story of a Union Branch at Ford Dagenham (Merlin Press, 2013), £15.95
Along the stretch of the Thames Estuary that runs from Barking and the North Circular at one end, along the A13 to Thurrock Lakeside, the Dartford Crossing and the M25 at the other, lies one of the most bizarre industrialised landscapes in the UK.
 
A history of attacks on unions’ political funds
Socialist Worker nr. 2362, jul 13 – side 17
Note: Unions are not legally allowed to support a political party in any way out of the general fund raised from members’ subscriptions. They have to set up a separate political fund.
 
Julie Sherry: Unions: Taking the temperature
Socialist Review nr. 382, jul 13 – side 14
Note: The union conference season has just finished. Julie Sherry looks at the mood among the activists who hold union organisation together in workplaces across Britain and asks what we can learn about the prospects for resistance to the Tories and employers.
 
John McLoughlin: Unison conference: Frustration, anger and demands for a fight
Socialist Worker nr. 2358, jun 13 – side 19
Note: Council workers from around Britain came to Liverpool this week for the Unison union’s local government sector conference.
 
Sadie Robinson: More workers join unions as austerity bites
Socialist Worker nr. 2357, jun 13 – side 17
Note: Right wingers like to paint trade unionists as dinosaurs that are dying out. But union membership in Britain is going up.
 
What We Think: More workers in unions
Socialist Worker nr. 2356, jun 13 – side 5
Note: More workers were members of trade unions in Britain last year than in 2011, according to new government figures.
 
Jerry Hicks – a rank and file challenge: now organise!
Socialist Review nr. 380, maj 13 – side 18
Note: Jerry Hicks stood as a rank and file candidate in the recent elections for the general secretary of Unite, the biggest union in Britain. He received 79,819 votes, 36 percent of the vote. Socialist Review spoke to Jerry about why he stood and the lessons of the campaign.
 
Jerry Hicks: ‘We need to take a lead in the fight’
Socialist Worker nr. 2343, mar 13 – side 17
Note: Voting for the next general secretary of the Unite union opens later this month – rank and file candidate Jerry Hicks argues for a new approach to fight the cuts.
 
Dave Sewell: Battle is on for a fighting Unite union
Socialist Worker nr. 2340, feb 13 – side 8
Note: More than 100 branches and workplaces of the Unite union have nominated blacklisted engineer Jerry Hicks to be their new general secretary.
 
Martin Smith: Britain’s trade unions: the shape of things to come
International Socialism Journal nr. 131, jul 11 – side 17
Note: The past has been
A mint of blood and sorrow—
That must not be
True of tomorrow.
Langston Hughes wrote the short poem “History”, just as the US labour movement rose like a phoenix out of the ashes of the devastation of the Great Depression of the 1930s.
 
Siobhan Brown: Book review: Mary Davis (ed): Class and Gender in British Labour History
Socialist Review nr. 359, jun 11 – side 27
Note: This is a varied collection of essays, interesting for the most part, covering women's involvement in the British labour movement. The essays cover a diverse geographical area, with the focus moving away from London to discuss women's trade unionism in areas such as Bradford, Leeds and Scotland. Its content also covers an extended time period, from Bradford weavers of the 1820s to the Leeds clothing workers of the 1970s, providing a broad assessment.
 
Yuri Prasad: Judge orders trust to reinstate Yunus Bakhsh
Socialist Worker nr. 2249, apr 11 – side 6
Note: Yunus Bakhsh, the high profile nurse and activist who was unlawfully sacked for trade union activities, won reinstatement at an employment tribunal last week.
 
Charlie Kimber: Right to Work conference: We need action to stop jobs massacre
Socialist Worker nr. 2185, jan 10 – side 16
Note: The massacre of thousands of jobs this week shows the central importance of the Right to Work conference on 30 January in Manchester.
 
Jonathon Shafi: Right to work: Conference call for all workers
Socialist Worker nr. 2184, jan 10 – side 16
Note: Young workers who are unionising new workplaces will be joining other delegates at the upcoming Right to Work conference.
 
Chris Bambery: Right to Work: Building resistance to cuts and job losses
Socialist Worker nr. 2181, dec 09 – side 4
Note: Workers are told that the recession is easing and things are getting better, but still hardly a week goes by without job cuts. It is against this backdrop that the Right to Work conference will take place.
 
Matthew Cookson: Is there pattern in raids on cleaners?
Socialist Worker nr. 2161, jul 09 – side 6
Note: Immigration officers arrested seven cleaners in a raid at the central London building of global insurance giant Willis on Tuesday of last week. All were employed by the contractor Mitie and all face deportation.
 
Yuri Prasad: Battle is on for postal workers
Socialist Worker nr. 2161, jul 09 – side 16
Note: The fight for the future of Royal Mail is intensifying.
Demands by leading activists in the postal workers’ CWU union for a national strike to beat back attacks by management have reached fever pitch after a third day of successful strike action across London, and parts of England and Scotland, on Friday of last week.
 
Mark Dolan: Step up the post strikes to win
Socialist Worker nr. 2160, jul 09 – side 16
Note: The fight by postal workers against Royal Mail bosses and the government that stands behind them is at a crucial stage – and the stakes could not be higher.
 
Step up the post strikes to win
Socialist Worker nr. 2160, jul 09 – side 16
Note: The attacks that postal workers are facing are being driven through by Royal Mail bosses who know they have the backing of the Labour government.
Despite this the postal workers’ CWU union continues to spend thousands of pounds in affiliation fees and donations to New Labour.
 
Yuri Prasad: Fighting for the union in call centres
Socialist Worker nr. 2159, jul 09 – side 8
Note: Bosses have for years managed to keep collective organisation out of most call centres but things are beginning to change
 
How activists can build a union from scratch in a call centre
Socialist Worker nr. 2159, jul 09 – side 9
Note: Call centre workers from across Britain came together at a meeting at last month’s CWU conference. The meeting was unlike most others at the conference, with many of the participants far younger than the average delegate, and most at firms that do not recognise the union.
 
Unjum Mirza: Union-made: Orchestrated demolition
Socialist Review nr. 338, jul 09 – side 17
Note: The 48-hour strike action taken by RMT tube workers that brought London to a virtual standstill in June has a number of lessons for us all.
 
Charlie Kimber: In the balance: the class struggle in Britain
International Socialism Journal nr. 122, apr 09 – side 33
Note: “We found out on TV in late November that we were going to close. We just carried on as normal, and it wasn’t until we actually came out and we were all upset when we signed our last bits of paper that we thought, ‘Well, why did we go quietly?’ Why did 30,000 of us go quietly?”
—Jayne Maltman, Woolworths worker, February 2009.
 
Revelations in Yunus Bakhsh case shake the union
Socialist Worker nr. 2137, feb 09 – side 6
Note: Attempts to witch-hunt well known health worker Yunus Bakhsh from his job and his union continue to cause a storm – particularly in the north east of England.
 
How did far right know details of Yunus Bakhsh case?
Socialist Worker nr. 2134, jan 09 – side 14
Note: It has shockingly come to light that the allegations against Yunus Bakhsh were available to Nazis before Yunus knew what they were.
 
Key accuser of health activist Yunus Bakhsh is a Facebook friend of BNP Nazi
Socialist Worker nr. 2134, jan 09 – side 16
Note: A most extraordinary scandal has been exposed in the case of Yunus Bakhsh, a health worker who has been sacked by his employer and expelled from the Unison union.
 
Jack Robertson: Book Review: Ups and downs of the rank and file
International Socialism Journal nr. 121, jan 09 – side 173
Note: John McIlroy, Nina Fishman and Alan Campbell (eds), The Post-War Compromise: British Trade Unions and Industrial Politics 1945-64 and The High Tide of British Trade Unionism: Trade Unions and Industrial Politics 1964-79 (Merlin, 2007), £18.95 each
These two volumes bring together essays from an impressive array of contributors on different aspects of industrial politics in the British trade union movement in the years after the Second World War.
 
Simon Basketter: Fight Labour’s plan to sell off Royal Mail (online only)
Socialist Worker nr. 2132, dec 08 
Note: Up to 50,000 postal workers jobs were put at risk yesterday after the unelected Secretary of State for Business Lord Peter Mandelson announced that he plans to sell off parts of the Royal Mail.
 
Chris Bambery: Why did unions stall the pay fight?
Socialist Worker nr. 2127, nov 08 – side 16
Note: Chris Bambery takes issue with those who say that recession means workers cannot fight back
 
Charlie Kimber: Stop this attack on right to strike
Socialist Worker nr. 2126, nov 08 – side 6
Note: A very serious attempt is being made by bosses and their legal jackals to extend the anti-union laws by stealth. This is a threat to every trade union and, if successful, will make it virtually impossible to organise legal strikes.
 
Mark Serwotka: strikes can beat the pay limits
Socialist Worker nr. 2126, nov 08 – side 16
Note: As 270,000 civil service workers prepare to strike over pay, PCS union general secretary Mark Serwotka spoke to Socialist Worker about the strike and the next steps in the campaign
 
PCS decision to call off strike is missed opportunity (online only)
Socialist Worker nr. 2126, nov 08 
Note: The PCS national executive committee has voted to suspend the strike over pay by 270,000 civil service workers, which was set to take place on Monday. The executive voted to suspend the strike for four weeks to allow three weeks of talks.
 
Teachers vote for action but NUT executive rules out strikes (online only)
Socialist Worker nr. 2126, nov 08 
Note: Teachers in the NUT union have voted narrowly in favour of taking several days of national strike action against their below-inflation pay offer. Yet despite this, the NUT executive will not call any action.
 
Amanda Logan: Union-made: Standing up room only
Socialist Review nr. 330, nov 08 – side 17
Note: Thousands of bus workers across London have been part of a defiant fight against the privatised bus companies.
The roots of the militancy can be traced back to November 2006 when Metroline drivers took on the employers and won after two days of strike action. It proved that drivers didn't need to be afraid of standing up to their employers. It was like a burst of fresh air that was long overdue.
 
Paul Williams + Andy Reid + Sue Bond: Civil service pay strikes to hit Gordon Brown hard
Socialist Worker nr. 2125, nov 08 – side 16
Note: Monday 10 November will see a national strike by around 270,000 civil service workers in the PCS union. This will be the latest stage in the battle of public sector workers against Gordon Brown’s pay curbs.
 
Mark Serwotka: Union-made: Finding our voice
Socialist Review nr. 329, okt 08 – side 17
Note: On occasion I get mail (some of it signed) telling me to stick to union issues and stay out of politics.
But what a hospital cleaner, tanker driver or civil servant gets paid compared to, say, a commodities trader or chief executive of a bank is political. And the government's policy of holding down public sector wages in a time of rampant inflation has made it doubly so.
 
Sean Vernell: With the workers always
Socialist Review nr. 329, okt 08 – side 22
Note: Profound economic crisis and renewed militancy from the working class means the relevance of Marxist ideas for 21st century trade unionism, and the role socialists can play within the movement, is worth revisiting.
 
Simon Basketter: Step up the fight to win decent pay
Socialist Worker nr. 2119, sep 08 – side 16
Note: The pay revolt against Gordon Brown’s government can win. There is a real potential for combined strikes and united action that could transform the political landscape of Britain.
 
Simon Basketter: TUC conference: Union leaders reflect growing pay anger
Socialist Worker nr. 2118, sep 08 – side 4
Note: Simon Basketter reports from Brighton on a changed mood among union leaders and growing calls for action at this years’ TUC conference
 
Nick Grant: Pay revolt: Teachers will ballot for national strike action
Socialist Worker nr. 2118, sep 08 – side 5
Note: The executive of the National Union of Teachers (NUT) agreed unanimously last week to ballot members for discontinuous strike action against a below inflation 2.45 percent pay deal.
 
Matthew Cookson: TUC conference: Don’t let workers pay for the crisis
Socialist Worker nr. 2117, sep 08 – side 5
Note: Next week’s TUC conference is a crucial opportunity to up the stakes in the battle against Gordon Brown’s pay curbs, writes Matthew Cookson
 
Charlie Kimber: Pay Freeze: Learn from the past to shape the future
Socialist Review nr. 328, sep 08 – side 10
Note: As increasing numbers of workers take action over pay Charlie Kimber examines the political dimension of the strikes and looks at the lessons we can learn from the past.
 
Sadie Robinson + Matthew Cookson: Growing industrial battle on London transport
Socialist Worker nr. 2114, aug 08 – side 6
Note: Matthew Cookson and Sadie Robinson report on a series of disputes on the buses and the underground that show a determined mood to fight back.
 
Michael Bradley + Judith Orr: The crisis fuels discontent
Socialist Review nr. 327, jul 08 – side 15
Note: Global economic turmoil has led to food riots abroad and spiralling inflation in Britain. Michael Bradley and Judith Orr report on the growing resentment towards the crisis-ridden Labour government
 
Richard Allday: Union-made: Shell tanker drivers' strike – oil on troubled waters
Socialist Review nr. 327, jul 08 – side 17
Note: "The Shell drivers have driven a coach and horses through the Brown and Darling pay freeze," said Tony Woodley, joint general secretary of Unite, after the Shell tanker drivers won a 14 percent pay deal last month.
 
Mark Serwotka: Union-made: United we stay
Socialist Review nr. 326, jun 08 – side 7
Note: The PCS civil service workers' union conference last month may turn out to have been the most significant in the union's ten year history.
 
Charlie Kimber: Pay, the fightback... and how much do you spend on your horse?
Socialist Review nr. 326, jun 08 – side 13
Note: Many workers are gaining confidence to join the resistance to pay cuts and privatisation. Charlie Kimber assesses the pressure on Gordon Brown from below.
 
Sean Vernell: Union-made: UCU strike ballot: Time to pay up
Socialist Review nr. 324, apr 08 – side 17
Note: Some 45,000 Further and Adult Education lecturers in the University College Union (UCU) are being balloted for strike action over pay alongside teachers on 24 April.
 
Les Skarratts: Union-made: Let the people decide: Merseyside FBU considers standing in elections
Socialist Review nr. 323, mar 08 – side 17
Note: Once again public services are under attack. The current round of government grant settlements, essential money for local authorities from central government, has been decided.
 
Alex Kenny: Union-made: Schools out!
Socialist Review nr. 322, feb 08 – side 15
Note: The National Union of Teachers (NUT) is preparing to ballot over 200,000 members in England and Wales for strike action against below inflation pay rises.
 
Gloria Doherty: Union-made: A striking tale
Socialist Review nr. 321, jan 08 – side 13
Note: I've been a fully paid up member of Unison for 19 years. And until we took action for eight weeks against the single status process at the end of last year, I had never even been on strike.
 
Karen Reissmann: Union-made: Unity in action
Socialist Review nr. 320, dec 07 – side 17
Note: On 5 November I was sacked after 25 years from the job I loved as a community psychiatric nurse. Three days later 150 community mental health workers went on strike indefinitely for my reinstatement.
 
Matthew Cookson: Workers to hit back on May Day
Socialist Worker nr. 2043, mar 07 – side 20
Note: Tuesday 1 May is set to see a major strike in defence of public services as the PCS civil service workers’ union steps up its action against job cuts, low pay and privatisation.
 
Karin Ladefoged: Typografstrejke i England: Stop Murdoch
Socialistisk Arbejderavis nr. 18, mar 86 – side 3
Note: I januar fyrede bladkongen Rupert Murdoch sine 6000 ansatte og flyttede hele produktionen til Wapping. 500 elektrikere, rekrutteret af elektrikernes fagforening EETPU, overtog arbejdet på det superkontrollerede computertrykkeri.
 
Janet Ure-Smith: A J Cook and the limits of syndicalism
Socialist Review nr. 66, jun 84 – side 7
Note: Fleet Street thrives on images of Arthur Scargill as a power-crazed, egocentric madman. But Scragill is not the first miners’ leader to have newspaper editors foaming at the mouth. Here Jane Ure Smith recalls another.
(Page 8)
 
Richard Hyman: British trade unionism: post-war trends and future prospects
International Socialism Journal nr. 8, mar 80 – side 64
Note: I am happy to accept the invitation to respond to Steve Jefferys’ article analysing modern British trade unionism.
 
Duncan Hallas: Trade unionists and revolution – A response to Richard Hyman
International Socialism Journal nr. 8, mar 80 – side 80
Note: Response to Hyman: British trade unionism: post-war trends and future prospects in this issue.
No marxist can quarrel with Richard Hyman’s point that ‘awareness of historical continuity is essential’ for understanding not only ‘wartime workplace organisation’ but also more generally.
 
John Deason: Notes of the Month: AUEW Elections
International Socialism Journal (1st series) nr. 79, jun 75 – side 6
Note: Right winger John Boyd has swept in as General Secretary of the Engineering Union with 164,276 votes against Broad Left candidate Bob Wright’s 96,216. This, the most dramatic victory for the right wing inside the union for years, has delighted the bosses’ press, who campaigned so hard for it.
 
John Deason: The Broad Left in the AUEW
International Socialism Journal (1st series) nr. 79, jun 75 – side 8
Note: THE AUEW, second biggest union in the country, is generally considered the most important of the ‘left wing’ unions. In contrast to its giant partner on the left, the Transport and General Workers Union, the AUEW has maintained an official ‘left’ stance on most issues.
 
Editorial 3: Trade Union ‘Reform’
International Socialism Journal (1st series) nr. 34, sep 68 – side 3
Note: ‘Our problem,’ Donovan declared, ‘is the strike which is both unofficial and unconstitutional.’
 
Joyce Rosser + Colin Barker: A Working-Class Defeat: The ENV Story
International Socialism Journal (1st series) nr. 31, dec 67 – side 21
Note: The initial emergence of ENV as a militant factory seems to have taken place in the period after the War, and particularly in the latter years of the Labour Government. In the context of a Government wage freeze, supported by the great majority of union executives, shop-floor action in support of local wage claims gradually developed.
 
Michael Kidron: The economic background of the recent strikes
International Socialism Journal (1st series) nr. 001, jun 58 – side 57
Note: Two things emerge clearly from the recent strikes in London. The first is that they are consistent with a trend – noticeable in the fifties – of sharpening industrial struggles growing in severity and scope.
The second – that the Labour movement is as yet unprepared for the battles implicit in such a trend ideologically and organisationally, and this despite incidents of remarkable self-sacrifice and devotion to principle on the part of the workers involved.
 
Storbritannien Minestrejke 1984-85
Charlie Lywood: Den britiske minestrejke 1984-85: Da minearbejderne blev slået
Socialistisk Arbejderavis nr. 338, maj 14 – side 4
Note: Minearbejderstrejken i Storbritannien, som startede for 30 år siden, 6. marts 1984, var en skelsættende strejke. Nederlaget efter næsten et års strejke var kulminationen på den konservative Margaret Thatchers angreb på fagbevægelsen.
 
Charlie Lywood: Den britiske minestrejke 1984-85: Kunne minearbejderne have vundet?
Socialistisk Arbejderavis nr. 338, maj 14 – side 4
Note: Den britiske minearbejderstrejke 1984-85 er en historie om solidaritet og heroisk militans, men også om kujoner i fagtoppen og om nederlag.
 
Charlie Lywood: Den britiske minestrejke 1984-85: Solidaritet fra arbejdere i Danmark
Socialistisk Arbejderavis nr. 338, maj 14 – side 4
Note: I Danmark var støttearbejdet til minearbejderne omfattende. Støttearbejdet skabte netværk, som betød, at arbejderne stod stærkt, da Påskestrejkerne begyndte.
 
Jack Robertson: 25 years after the Great Miners’ Strike
International Socialism Journal nr. 126, apr 10 – side 121
Note: The year-long miners’ strike which started in March 1984 marked a decisive turning point in the history of the class struggle in Britain. In the 20th century it is only matched by the General Strike of 1926.
 
Jack Robertson: The Miners’ Campaign Tapes: Shocking film of the war waged against Britain’s miners
Socialist Worker nr. 2183, jan 10 – side 11
Note: Newly released footage of the 1984-85 Miners’ Strike shows what the media buried
 
Ian Mitchell: Book review: Strike by Name
Socialist Review nr. 338, jul 09 – side 29
Note: Norman Strike, Bookmarks Publications; £8
Former miner Norman Strike decided to mark the 25th anniversary of the 1984-5 miners' strike by blogging his diary from the strike on the internet. This proved so popular that it has been put together for this book.
 
More4 Miners' Strike Night
Socialist Worker nr. 2156, jun 09 – side 11
Note: Digital TV channel More4 is commemorating the 25th anniversary of the Miners’ Strike with an evening of documentaries on one of the most important class battles in British history.
 
Norman Strike interviewed on his Miners’ Strike diary
Socialist Worker nr. 2146, apr 09 – side 13
Note: Durham miner Norman Strike kept a diary of his life during the 1984-5 strike
 
Mike Simons: Book Review: Francis Beckett and David Henke: Marching to the Fault Line
Socialist Review nr. 334, mar 09 – side 27
Note: Marching to the Fault Line is a fascinating, if flawed, account of the great miners' strike of 1984-85. Francis Beckett and David Henke have unearthed important government material from the strike, and had access to the diaries and memories of a range of senior Labour Party and trade union figures for the book.
 
Editorial: Erasing our memories of the Battle of Orgreave
Socialist Worker nr. 2116, aug 08 – side 12
Note: In May 1984 the police rioted in South Yorkshire. In what became known as the Battle of Orgreave, thousands of police baton-charged striking miners, who were piketting the local coking plant.
 
Pia Færing: Minearbejderstrejken: 364 dage mod Thatcher
Socialistisk Arbejderavis nr. 7, apr 85 – side 4
Note: Efter et års forbitret kamp mod Englands konservative regering måtte minearbejderne give op og gå tilbage i arbejde. Uden den aftale om minelukninger, de havde kæmpet for at få med det nationale kulråd NCB.
 
Pia Færing: Minearbejderstrejken: Kvinderne organiserede selv
Socialistisk Arbejderavis nr. 7, apr 85 – side 4
Note: Allerede i strejkens sjette uge begyndte kvinderne i enkelte Yorkshire-miner at organisere sig i aktionsgrupper – »Womens Action Groups«. Ideen spredte sig meget hurtigt, og ved strejkens slutning havde samtlige strejkende miner en kvindegruppe.
 
Pia Færing: Minearbejderstrejken: King Arthur blev siddende på sin trone
Socialistisk Arbejderavis nr. 7, apr 85 – side 4
Note: Selv som intetanende turist i London slipper man ikke for synet af Arthur Scargill. Sammen med Humphrey Bogart, Liza Minelli og Natacha Kinski står stjernen Arthur Scargill i modtagelsesrummet på Madame Tussauds vokskabinet. Måske et noget aparte selskab – men fæller dem alle er måske, at de har spillet en del hovedroller.
 
Pia Færing: Minearbejderstrejken: Som penge fra himlen
Socialistisk Arbejderavis nr. 7, apr 85 – side 5
Note: Det engelske minearbejderforbund NUM fik midt under strejken alle sine midler beslaglagt, og det betød selvfølgelig økonomiske problemer for forbundet. De blev fortrinsvis klaret via lån fra andre fagforeninger og penge fra NUMs midler i udlandet.
 
Pia Færing: Minearbejderstrejken: Politiet fik for let spil
Socialistisk Arbejderavis nr. 7, apr 85 – side 5
Note: Politiet kom til at spille en vigtig rolle i minearbejderstrejken. De fleste billeder fra strejken er oversået med sorte eller grønne uniformer. Over 10.000 minearbejdere har været arresteret af politiet, og endnu flere har fået bank.
 
Pia Færing: Den engelske kulminestrejke: Kvinder imod jernladyen
Socialistisk Arbejderavis nr. 6, mar 85 – side 8
Note: Skønt der ikke findes een eneste kvinde i de engelske kulminer, så er minearbejderstrejken ikke mindst blevet båret igennem af kvinder.
 
Jason Meyler: Den engelske kulminestrejke: Hvorfor tabte de?
Socialistisk Arbejderavis nr. 6, mar 85 – side 8
Note: En af de vigtigste og længste strejker i Europa siden krigen er slut. Seks mænd har mistet deres liv, tusinder er blevet kvæstet under politiets knipler og minearbejderne og deres familier har lidt enorm nød.
 
Mike Simons + Alex Callinicos: The Great Strike: The miners’ strike of 1984-5 and its lessons
International Socialism Journal nr. 27-28, mar 85 – side 7
Note: Introduction – 7
1. The strike begins – 10
2. Towards confrontation – 18
3. The tragedy of Nottinghamshire – 47
4. Orgreave and the battle for steel – 82
5. Solidarity and bureaucracy – 120
6. Communities under siege – 159
7. The unnecessary defeat – 197
8. What went wrong? – 230
 
Charlie Lywood: Minestrejken i Storbritannien: Strejke i afgørende fase
Socialistisk Arbejderavis nr. 5, feb 85 – side 8
Note: Minearbejderstrejken i Storbritannien er ligesom en rutchebane. Først tror man, at strejken stiger til sejr. I det næste øjeblik suser man ned ad bakken igen til tilsyneladende nederlag. Og så vender det igen.
 
Minestrejken i Storbritannien: Julen er overstået – stop et januarudsalg
Socialistisk Arbejderavis nr. 4, jan 85 – side 8
Note: De engelske minearbejdere vandt en lille sejr over Thatcher ved at holde sig i strejke julen over.
Trods forsøg på bestikkelse sagde langt de fleste minearbejdere nej til at gå ned i minerne igen. De ved nemlig, at et nederlag betyder, at mange af dem aldrig' kommer i arbejde igen.
 
Ågot Berger: Storbritannien: Uden støtte – sort jul for minestrejken
Socialistisk Arbejderavis nr. 3, dec 84 – side 8
Note: Thatcher og Kulkompagniet har forsøgt at købe minearbejderne tilbage til minerne med en julebonus på op til 1400 £ (ca. 19.000 kr.).
 
Freddie Nielsen: Solidaritet med de britiske minearbejdere
Socialistisk Arbejderavis nr. 2, nov 84 – side 8
Note: KFK’s handel med skruebrækkerkul til England blev en dyr fornøjelse for dem. Mandag den 8. oktober blev det engelske skib »Militence« blokaderamt i Århus havn, da havnearbejderne nægtede at laste skibet.
 
Ågot Berger: Minestrejken i Storbritannien: »Vi kan ikke kues«
Socialistisk Arbejderavis nr. 2, nov 84 – side 8
Note: Minearbejdere, deres koner og børn, ja hele lokalsamfund er fast besluttet på at kæmpe til »the bitter end« – til sejren er i hus. Efter 8 måneders strejke har de intet at tabe.
 
Jason Meyler: Minearbejderstrejken: Syv måneder mod Thatcher
Socialistisk Arbejderavis nr. 1, okt 84 – side 4
Note: Den syv måneder lange britiske minearbejderstrejke er blevet til en af de vigtigste arbejderkampe i flere årtier. En sejr for Thatchers regering vil give det grønne lys til et hidtil uset angreb på arbejderklassen i England. En sejr for minearbejderne vil til gengæld betyde et massivt nederlag for Thatcher og ændre kampmulighederne for alle arbejdere i England.
 
Editorial: Miners’ strike: Politics the key
Socialist Review nr. 67, jul 84 – side 3
Note: The miners’ strike has developed into a war of attrition.
 
Editorial: The Miners’ Strike: Crisis of leadership
Socialist Review nr. 66, jun 84 – side 3
Note: Four months of striking by the miners has had a substantial effect on the Labour movement. As the dispute develops into the most bitter and protracted struggle the NUM has fought since the General Strike, and into the hardest fought struggle against the Thatcher government ever to take place, a number of important lessons have become starkly clear.
 
Norah Carlin: The Miners’ Strike: Wives, mothers and fighters
Socialist Review nr. 66, jun 84 – side 5
Note: The miners’ strike has seen both very backward sexist attitudes from some miners and a wonderful mobilisation of miners’ wives and girlfriends to help win the strike.
 
Chris Harman: Behind The Miners’ Strike: Class struggle hots up
Socialist Review nr. 65, maj 84 – side 5
Note: At the annual Easter rally of the Socialist Workers Party, Chris Harman, editor of Socialist Worker, examined the state of class struggle in Britain today. We reprint his talk here.
 
Storbritannien venstrefløj
Se også: Venstrefløj Storbritannien
Emma Davis: Book Review: 1956 and after
International Socialism Journal nr. 151, jul 16 – side 210
Note: A review of Evan Smith and Matthew Worley (eds), Against the Grain: The British far left from 1956 (Manchester University Press, 2014), £75
The need for a genuine left alternative to cuts, privatisation, racism, war and climate change is urgent. The huge enthusiasm around the election of left winger Jeremy Corbyn to the leadership of the Labour Party shows the immense potential for unified struggles. However, a glance at the history of the British left will confirm a record of multiple organisations and groups that can be confusing, especially to those new to the movement.
 
Allister Mactaggart: Book Review: The Aldermaston generation
International Socialism Journal nr. 149, jan 16 – side 219
Note: Cal Winslow (ed), E P Thompson and the Making of the New Left: Essays & Polemics (Lawrence & Wishart, 2014) £15.99
This collection of E P Thompson’s writings covers the period from 1956 to 1963, a tumultuous but also highly creative and active period for Thompson as a key organiser in the New Left following the Soviet invasion of Hungary, and the resultant ­resignation of over 10,000 members from the British Communist Party.
 
Andrew Stone: Book Review: From militant to minister
International Socialism Journal nr. 146, apr 15 – side 214
Note: Paula Bartley, Ellen Wilkinson: From Red Suffragist to Government Minister (Pluto, 2014), £11.50, and Matt Perry, “Red Ellen” Wilkinson: Her Ideas, Movements and World (Manchester University Press, 2014), £75
Ellen Wilkinson led an extraordinary life. The daughter of an under-employed insurance collector and Methodist minister in Manchester, she took on many guises in her political life: suffragist, teacher, trade union organiser, Communist, Labourist and ultimately cabinet minister. She was an ardent and persuasive public speaker, and a journalist, novelist and writer of several influential books, including her account of the Jarrow Crusade—The Town That Was Murdered—that has lived on in the popular memory as ­epitomising ­depression-hit 1930s Britain. She was also one of the foremost anti-imperialist voices of the inter-war years.
 
Alex Callinicos: The left after Grangemouth
International Socialism Journal nr. 141, jan 14 – side 3
Note: The last few weeks of 2013 saw three important events in the life of the radical left in Britain-the defeat suffered by workers at the Grangemouth oil refining and chemicals complex in Scotland, the founding conference of Left Unity, and the third conference held that year of the Socialist Workers Party (SWP). Plainly these events are of a different order of significance.
 
Jane Hardy + Joseph Choonara: Neoliberalism and the British working class: A reply to Neil Davidson
International Socialism Journal nr. 140, okt 13 – side 103
Note: Neil Davidson has produced a lengthy piece on the neoliberal era in Britain, which raises important questions for us as revolutionary socialists. We agree with much of his narrative. However, the article is a piece of two halves and there are problems with both.
 
Neil Davidson: The neoliberal era in Britain: Historical developments and current perspectives
International Socialism Journal nr. 139, jul 13 – side 171
Note: The world economy has experienced four systemic crises since the emergence of capitalism as a global system; the years 1873, 1929, 1973 marked the commencement of the first three.
 
Matt Perry: Frank Henderson 1925-2009: A remarkable and revolutionary life
Socialist Worker nr. 2183, jan 10 – side 6
Note: Frank had a remarkable life: he was in Italy and Greece during the Second World War and encountered those countries’ partisan movements; he saw the last days of British rule in Palestine, the early days of Algerian independence and was at the battle of Saltley Gate in the 1972 miners’ strike.
 
Gareth Jenkins: Obiturary: Edward Upward (1903-2009)
Socialist Review nr. 334, mar 09 – side 34
Note: Edward Upward, the last of the 1930s generation of left-wing British writers, has died at the age of 105. It is astonishing to think that someone who was in his late 20s when the Wall Street Crash heralded the Great Depression should live on to see an equally deep crisis begin to convulse the system once again.
 
Sheila McGregor: SWP Democracy Commission
Socialist Worker nr. 2137, feb 09 – side 10
Note: The Democracy Commission was set up at the recent Socialist Workers Party (SWP) annual conference. It is made up of ten elected members and four members appointed by the SWP’s Central Committee. Its first meeting will be on Saturday 7 February.
 
Mark Serwotka: Union-made: Finding our voice
Socialist Review nr. 329, okt 08 – side 17
Note: On occasion I get mail (some of it signed) telling me to stick to union issues and stay out of politics.
But what a hospital cleaner, tanker driver or civil servant gets paid compared to, say, a commodities trader or chief executive of a bank is political. And the government's policy of holding down public sector wages in a time of rampant inflation has made it doubly so.
 
Which way now for the left?
Socialist Worker nr. 2102, maj 08 – side 8
Note: Gordon Brown has concluded that his trashing in local elections earlier this month means that Labour needs to move further to the right. Socialist Worker spoke to a range of leading figures and activists on the left to gauge their response, and to ask them what needs to be done.
 
Chris Bambery: Debate on the Left: Charting the way ahead after 1 May elections
Socialist Worker nr. 2101, maj 08 – side 5
Note: “Where do we go from here?” is the question being asked by tens of thousands of people on the left, in the movements and in the trade unions after the 1 May elections.
 
SWP party council: Fighting on all fronts can help create an alternative
Socialist Worker nr. 2101, maj 08 – side 5
Note: Delegates from across the country came together at a Socialist Workers Party (SWP) national meeting last Sunday to discuss the 1 May election results and the way forward for socialists.
 
Lindsey German: London mayoral elections: Why I'm standing
Socialist Review nr. 322, feb 08 – side 7
Note: The election for London mayor is shaping up to be a celebrity clash between the incumbent mayor, Ken Livingstone, and his main rival, the Tory Neanderthal MP for Henley, Boris Johnson.
 
Mark Serwotka: Building an alternative to New Labour
Socialist Review nr. 321, jan 08 – side 10
Note: As Gordon Brown's neoliberal attacks on workers intensify, Mark Serwotka, general secretary of the PCS civil servants' union, outlines his vision for a fighting left in Britain today.
 
James Dean: Victor Grayson: remembering an independent socialist MP
Socialist Worker nr. 2065, aug 07 – side 13
Note: A militant and independent socialist who was elected to parliament a century ago, shouldn’t be forgotten, writes James Dean.
 
Barry Conway: Feedback: 1956 and Labour
International Socialism Journal nr. 113, jan 07 – side 206
Note: Response to Stan Newens: Memories of a seminal year (1956) in International Socialism 112.
 
Paul Blackledge: The New Left’s renewal of Marxism
International Socialism Journal nr. 112, sep 06 – side 125
Note: The birth of the New Left in 1956 marked an important turning point in post-war British history. For the first time since the Second World War a political space opened within which socialists could hope to make headway building a movement independent of both Labourism and Stalinism.
 
Stan Newens: Memories of a seminal year (1956)
International Socialism Journal nr. 112, sep 06 – side 155
Note: Stan Newens recalls what it was like to live through that tumultuous year as a young socialist.
 
Ian Taylor: Respect: the view from below
International Socialism Journal nr. 108, sep 05 – side 57
Note: Interviews with candidates and activists from East London
 
John Newsinger: An inferior brew (A review of Neil Redfern: "Class or Nation: Communists, Imperialism and Two World Wars" (Tauris Academic Studies, 2005), £47.50)
International Socialism Journal nr. 108, sep 05 – side 200
Note: Academic discussion of the Communist Party of Great Britain (CPGB) has in recent years been dominated by attempts to minimise the organisation’s subordination to Moscow.
 
Respect: the record so far
International Socialism Journal nr. 106, mar 05 – side 111
Note: What is the shape of Britain after eight years of New Labour? What has happened to industry, the working class, the schools, the urban landscape? How badly damaged is Labour's base? Jane Hardy, Jacob Middleton, Terry Wrightly, Alex Law, Gerry Mooney and Charlie Kimber provide insights into these issues in a special section.
 
Chris Bambery: Scottish Socialist Party: Why did they dump Tommy Sheridan?
Socialist Worker nr. 1930, dec 04 – side 4
Note: TORY LEADER Michael Howard was made to look a fool recently after sacking Boris Johnson for having an affair. The private life of a politician carries few surprises for most people, and doesn’t rate on the same level as telling multiple lies to justify war.
 
Paul Langhoff: England: Sejr til ‘Røde Ken’
Socialistisk Arbejderavis nr. 183, jun 00 – side 4
Note: Den venstreorienterede kandidat, Ken Livingstone, vandt en overbevisende sejr ved borgmestervalget i London den 4. maj.
 
Tony Cliff 1917-2000: En revolutionær kæmpe
Socialistisk Arbejderavis nr. 182, maj 00 – side 11
Note: Kampen for et socialistisk samfund har mistet en meget inspirerende og engageret kraft, da Tony Cliff, grundlæggeren af IS-tendensen, døde d. 9. april.
 
Chris Harman + Mike Gonzalez + Paul Foot + Alex Callinicos + John Molyneux: Open letter to New Left Review
International Socialism Journal nr. 50, mar 91 – side 101
 
Donny Gluckstein: The last of the reformists? – A review of Tony Benn’s Diaries 1963-1980
International Socialism Journal nr. 50, mar 91 – side 105
Note: Tony Benn has been the standard bearer of the Labour left for more than a generation. He is one of the few Labour MPs who stood out against the Gulf War. Here Donny Gluckstein reviews all the volumes of the Benn Diaries that have been published so far. He explains why Benn became a socialist, examines his record and charts his ultimate failure.
 
Ian Birchall: Raymond Williams: centrist tragedy?
International Socialism Journal nr. 39, jun 88 – side 139
Note: Ian Birchall assesses the work of Marxist critic Raymond Williams, who died earlier this year.
 
Ian Birchall: From Benn to Madonna: five years of 'New Socialist'
International Socialism Journal nr. 35, jun 87 – side 116
 
Sheila McGregor: The history and politics of Militant
International Socialism Journal nr. 33, sep 86 – side 59
 
Ian Birchall: Left alive or left for dead? The terminal crisis in the British Communist Party
International Socialism Journal nr. 30, sep 85 – side 67
 
Jon Bloomfield: 'Marxism Today' – a reply to Alex Callinicos
International Socialism Journal nr. 30, sep 85 – side 107
Note: A reply to Alex Callinicos: “The politics of ‘Marxism Today’” in ISJ2:29
(Bloomfield is replying from ‘Marxism Today’)
 
Alex Callinicos: The politics of ‘Marxism Today’
International Socialism Journal nr. 29, jun 85 – side 128
Note: Marxism Today, the theoretical and discussion journal of the Communist Party of Great Britain, has been transformed since 1977 from a rather dull monthly of interest only, if at all, to CP members to a lively, attractively produced and controversial magazine widely read on the left.
 
Norah Carlin + Ian Birchall: Kinnock's favourite Marxist: Eric Hobsbawm and the working class
International Socialism Journal nr. 21, sep 83 – side 88
 
Janet Ure-Smith: The establishment of a Bolshevik newspaper in Britain in the 1920s
International Socialism Journal nr. 18, dec 82 – side 30
Note: Newspapers of the Left today stand within a particular journalistic tradition: that of the ‘radical press’, which can be traced back to the early part of the nineteenth century, to papers like Black Dwarf, The Poor Man’s Guardian and the Northern Star. These were essentially the mouthpiece of working class struggle; they represent a strand of journalism which developed distinct from and in opposition to papers like The Times which by 1850 were well on the way to becoming a fully fledged form of capitalist enterprise.
 
Geoff Hodgson: Britain's crisis and the road to international socialism – a reply to Jonathan Bearman
International Socialism Journal nr. 7, dec 79 – side 82
Note: The article that has provoked the greatest interest has been Jonathan Bearman's "Anatomy of the Bennite Left", which was published in our last issue. In this issue we publish the first of a number of responses, this one by Geoff Hodgson, the prospective Labour candidate for Manchester (Withington).
 
Jonathan Bearman: An anatomy of the Bennite left
International Socialism Journal nr. 6, sep 79 – side 51
Note: We would like to draw our readers' attention to Jonathan Bearman's Anatomy of the Bennite Left. There is no doubt at all that the politics of the so called 'alternative economic policy' and the forthcoming debates within and around the Labour Party, will attract a lot of attention in the coming months. This article does a great deal to clear away some of the confusions that surround some of these notions.
 
Tony Cliff: Interview: Where do we go from here?
Socialist Review nr. 1, apr 78 – side 12
Note: This interview with TONY CLIFF, a leading member of the Socialist Workers’ Party, is the first in a series with socialists of differing viewpoints on the state of the British Labour movement. The interview was conducted by Alex Callinicos.
 
Briefing: The Crisis in the British Communist Party
International Socialism Journal (1st series) nr. 101, sep 77 – side 15
Note: On July 17 1977 Sid French, secretary of the Surrey District of the Communist Party, announced the formation of the New Communist Party. The breakaway by the longstanding leader of the Stalinist opposition within the Communist Party marked the most serious crisis in the CP since 1956 when the Russian invasion of Hungary caused at least 7,000 members, many of them workers, to resign in disgust.
 
Tony Cliff: On Perspectives
International Socialism Journal (1st series) nr. 36, apr 69 – side 15
Note: On May 22, 1968, the French Prime Minister, Pompidou, told the national assembly: “Nothing will ever be exactly the same.” Today such a statement sounds platitudinous. We shall continue to work and struggle in the glow of the French May events. Just as between 1789 and 1848, the imagery – the personnel, the dramatic events of the first French Revolution – were the terms of reference of all revolutionaries and when one reads Lenin or Plekhanov prior to 1905, the events of 1848 and 1871 are central in evaluating the current events in Russia decades later, so France 1968 will be central to the analysis of the tasks and perspectives of revolutionaries in advanced industrial societies in the years to come.
What is necessary, however, is not a euphoric generalisation about the great days of May and June 1968, but a sober analysis of the lessons of those events.
 
James Higgins: Review: Morning Star
International Socialism Journal (1st series) nr. 36, apr 69 – side 40
Note: History of the Communist Party of Great Britain: Vol 1 Formation and Early Years 1919-1924
James Klugman
Lawrence and Wishart, 63s.
 
Editorial: The Communist Party
International Socialism Journal (1st series) nr. 31, dec 67 – side 2
Note: Despite belief, the Government continues to declare particularly resistant workers Communist whenever it suits its purpose. This should be of less note than the Communist Party’s reaction to such accusations – self-righteous indignation that so grave a libel should be perpetrated. The response contrasts with the Party’s now very distant Bolshevik past.
 
Wales
Tim Evans (Wales): Clear red water or Fabianism with a valleys accent? Wales and the politics of devolution
International Socialism Journal nr. 141, jan 14 – side 161
Note: Seven years ago Britain’s main nationalist parties were making tangible gains. In 2007 the Scottish National Party (SNP), Sinn Fein and Plaid Cymru all took some degree of control in their respective devolved institutions. Sinn Fein entered into a new power-sharing agreement at Stormont, the SNP won control of the Scottish Parliament for the first time and Plaid Cymru went into a ruling coalition with Labour in the Welsh Senedd—the national assembly. Yet if you fast forward to 2014, only two of those parties have consolidated their gains. Plaid Cymru has failed to do so.
 
Tim Evans (Wales): Review: How green was my valley?
International Socialism Journal nr. 134, apr 12 – side 216
Note: Dai Smith, In The Frame: Memory in Society, 1910 to 2010 (Parthian 2010), £20
Dai Smith’s 446-page book In the Frame—”an alternative history of the past century in Wales” as he calls it—is an occasionally unwieldy collection of essays on Welsh working class history and culture which, at first sight, seems disjointed in terms of a unifying theme or connecting narrative.
 
Tim Evans: The Great Unrest and a Welsh town
International Socialism Journal nr. 131, jul 11 – side 153
Note: The key confrontation of Britain’s first national railway strike—for better pay and an end to an unfair arbitration system—occurred on Saturday 19 August 1911 in Llanelli, a tinplate-producing town in south west Wales.
 
Tim Evans: Book review: Socialism through devolution?
International Socialism Journal nr. 126, apr 10 – side 210
Note: Nick Davies and Darren Williams, Clear Red Water: Welsh Devolution and Socialist Politics (Francis Bootle Publishers, 2009), £7.99
Nick Davies and Darren Williams have written a thought-provoking book, which has been compared to the classic 1912 pamphlet The Miners’ Next Step. The authors call for Welsh Labour to put into practice a more consistently socialist programme. They argue for a distinctive way of delivering public services which avoids the marketisation and outsourcing characteristic of New Labour and for a greater engagement with Plaid Cymru, the Greens and other left, campaigning and political groups. They argue that “the members of all these groups should be encouraged to become part of a red-green alliance based on a renewed Welsh socialist project”.
 
Tim Evans: Balancing act
Socialist Review nr. 343, jan 10 – side 5
Note: The new First Minister of the Welsh Assembly, Carwyn Jones, is a slight turn to the right from his predecessor, Rhodri Morgan, who retired last month after ten years.
 
Charlie Kimber: Llanelli 1911: war on the railways
Socialist Worker nr. 2181, dec 09 – side 13
Note: The great railway strike of 1911 saw incredible battles between workers, scabs, bosses and soldiers.
 
Siân Ruddick: Radical Wales: Smashing the myth of a united Wales
Socialist Worker nr. 2135, jan 09 – side 6
Note: In her final column Siân Ruddick looks at workers’ resistance from the 1920s to today
 
Siân Ruddick: Radical Wales: Unrest rolled out across the Valleys
Socialist Worker nr. 2134, jan 09 – side 4
Note: Welsh workers’ struggles from the mid-19th century onwards were very powerful, writes Siân Ruddick in the second part of our series
 
Siân Ruddick: Radical Wales: Raising the red flag for workers’ rights
Socialist Worker nr. 2133, jan 09 – side 6
Note: A series of struggles in the early 19th century shook the status quo in Wales, writes Siân Ruddick on the first part of our new series.
 
Skotland
Keir McKechnie: Analysis: Scotland: the genie is out of the bottle
International Socialism Journal nr. 144, okt 14 – side 3
Note: The British ruling class wheezed a huge collective sigh of relief at the Scottish independence referendum result. The No camp secured victory with 55 percent of the vote and the Yes side polled 45 percent. 97 percent of the electorate registered to vote and the turn-out was an incredible 86 percent, the highest in any election in the history of Britain.
 
Alex Callinicos: Analysis: Towards the break-up of Britain?
International Socialism Journal nr. 143, jul 14 – side 11
Note: Creeping up on the British state is potentially its biggest internal crisis since the struggle for Irish self-determination reached its climax a century ago. The outcome of the referendum on Scottish independence on 18 September could tear a huge chunk out of the United Kingdom, rendering its very name a joke, with major geopolitical, economic and domestic political consequences.
 
Bo Nielsen + Christine Bergen: Antifascisme i Skotland: Ind i moskéer og fagforeninger!
Socialistisk Arbejderavis nr. 331, aug 13 
Note: Socialistisk Arbejderavis har mødt Ayesha Saleem, en 39-årig aktivist fra Edinburgh, til en snak om antifascistisk arbejde i Unite Against Fascism, hvor hun er aktiv.
 
Michael Lavalette: The decline and fall of Glasgow Rangers FC
Socialist Review nr. 371, jul 12 – side 4
Note: Back in February Glasgow Rangers Football Club entered administration. The administrators claimed there were short-term problems and the club would be back to normal shortly.
 
Neil Davidson: The politics of the Scottish independence referendum
International Socialism Journal nr. 134, apr 12 – side 27
Note: David Cameron chose to open 2012 with one of those tactical misjudgements increasingly typical of the overconfident, untested politicians of the coalition. On this occasion the subject was the timing and content of a future referendum on Scottish independence.
 
Iain Ferguson: Salmond smiling
Socialist Review nr. 359, jun 11 – side 5
Note: Anyone wanting to understand the reasons for the Scottish National Party's landslide election victory in Scotland on 5 May could do worse than read the speech delivered by Alex Salmond as he was sworn in as first minister on 20 May.
 
Mike Gonzalez: Anger at cuts boosts Scottish nationalists
Socialist Worker nr. 2251, maj 11 – side 5
Note: The polls had predicted that the Scottish National Party (SNP) would win last week’s Scottish elections—but no one anticipated the scale of Labour’s defeat.
 
Andrew Fullwood: Scottish teachers announce a ballot against pay freeze
Socialist Worker nr. 2241, mar 11 
Note: Industrial action came a step closer today, Tuesday, as Scotland’s biggest teachers’ union announced that it would ballot its members over proposals to impose a two-year pay freeze and changes to working conditions.
 
Tommy Sheridan jailed for three years – a statement from Solidarity
Socialist Worker nr. 2236, jan 11 
Note: "Scottish justice has notched up another political miscarriage of justice alongside that of Al Megrahi and Muir of Huntershill”
 
Eileen Boyle: Scottish independence: Is Britain set to break up?
Socialist Worker nr. 2181, dec 09 – side 12
Note: Will David Cameron be the last prime minister of the United Kingdom? With the prospect of a Tory government looming in 2010, the argument for independence is once again front page news in Scotland.
 
Dave Sherry: Scottish unions take up fight over future of housing
Socialist Worker nr. 2137, feb 09 – side 4
Note: Scotland faces its biggest housing crisis in 60 years. The economic collapse has destroyed the myth that competition and the “free market” can deliver on housing.
 
Spread the solidarity for Glasgow council’s indefinite strike
Socialist Worker nr. 2137, feb 09 – side 14
Note: The indefinite strike by Glasgow community service supervisors is entering its fifth week.
The 21 workers are fighting regrading resulting from the council’s single status agreement.
 
Chris Bambery: Our history: Scotland’s solidarity with Republican Spain
Socialist Worker nr. 2132, dec 08 – side 9
Note: “If I don’t go out and fight fascism, I’ll just have to wait and fight it here.” That was how John Patsy McEwan explained his decision to leave Dundee to go and fight in the Spanish Civil War – alongside hundreds of others.
 
Scotland: New Labour leader will not mean a change of fortunes
Socialist Worker nr. 2119, sep 08 – side 2
Note: The election of Iain Gray as the new leader of Scottish Labour was greeted by one MSP with the claim that this was a “Tony Blair moment”. By that he meant Gray could lead the party to two electoral triumphs. This rings hollow.
 
Eileen Boyle: Scotland: The SNP’s left wing gloss to pro-business policies
Socialist Worker nr. 2118, sep 08 – side 9
Note: The Scottish National Party (SNP) government in Scotland recently announced its proposed legislative programme for the coming year.
 
Claire Lyall: As prices soar, millions of us are...: Fighting to put food on the table
Socialist Worker nr. 2115, aug 08 – side 1
Note: Thousands of workers in Scotland strike to defend their living standards | Step up the action to beat Brown’s pay limits
 
Simon Basketter: Solid council workers' strike shuts down Scotland (online only)
Socialist Worker nr. 2115, aug 08 
Note: Reports on the one-day strike on Wednesday 20 August 2008 across Scotland
 
Simon Basketter: United action to hit Scotland
Socialist Worker nr. 2113, aug 08 – side 16
Note: The latest front in the war against Gordon Brown’s public sector pay curbs was opened last week after 150,000 council workers in Scotland voted to strike. They are set to take action on 20 August.
 
Jimmy Ross: Labour’s Glasgow East defeat is down to policies
Socialist Worker nr. 2112, aug 08 – side 3
Note: Labour’s defeat in Glasgow East last week was historic. The constituency is one of Labour’s heartlands. If the 22.5 percent swing to the Scottish National Party (SNP) was repeated across Scotland, Labour would have only one Scottish MP left.
 
Neil Davidson: Scotland’s new road to reform?
International Socialism Journal nr. 118, apr 08 – side 23
Note: A year has elapsed since the Scottish National Party (SNP) formed its first government in the devolved Scottish Parliament. The SNP took power at a time when neoliberal strategies all but completely dominated mainstream politics. However, the SNP appears to have broken with the neoliberal consensus.
 
Anger as police arrest Tommy Sheridan
Socialist Worker nr. 2082, dec 07 – side 2
Note: Former MSP and long standing socialist campaigner Tommy Sheridan has been arrested and charged with perjury.
 
Afghans pay price of New Labour’s war
Socialist Worker nr. 2081, dec 07 – side 4
Note: The British media heralded the capture of Musa Qala, a town in Helmand province which has been under Taliban control for ten months, as a decisive turning point in the war in Afghanistan.
 
Neil Davidson: Neoliberal logic exposed by Scottish National Party
Socialist Worker nr. 2078, nov 07 – side 4
Note: In a recent article in The Guardian, Scottish journalist Iain MacWhirter noted Gordon Brown’s “apparent capitulation to neoconservatism” and asked what might have happened if Brown had taken a different path.
 
Terry Wrigley: Scotland: Edinburgh schools campaign forces SNP retreat
Socialist Worker nr. 2067, sep 07 – side 6
Note: A vigorous campaign by parents and pupils has put a stop to Edinburgh city council's proposal to close one in six schools.
 
Neil Davidson: Scotland: Tartan imperialism
Socialist Worker nr. 2065, aug 07 – side 12
Note: Scotland’s historical role in Malawi contradicts attempts to present itself as an ‘oppressed’ nation, writes Neil Davidson.
 
Neil Davidson: Socialists and Scottish Independence
International Socialism Journal nr. 114, apr 07 – side 33
 
Mike Gonzalez: The split in the Scottish Socialist Party
International Socialism Journal nr. 112, sep 06 – side 66
Note: The Scottish Socialist Party achieved a breakthrough seven years ago and was seen by many as a model to be followed. But it has split apart. Mike Gonzalez analyses what went wrong, and how the left in Scotland can recover.
 
Iain Ferguson: Positive moves in SSP dispute
Socialist Worker nr. 2007, jul 06 – side 2
Note: The Scottish Socialist Party (SSP) took a major step last weekend towards resolving the internal crisis that has wracked the party over recent months
 
Kelly Hilditch: Edinburgh tenants tell how they fought off privatisation
Socialist Worker nr. 1987, feb 06 
Note: Council tenants from Edinburgh spoke to Kelly Hilditch about their recent victory and the fight for more investment they still face.
 
Neil Davidson: Book review: Scotland: almost afraid to know itself?
International Socialism Journal nr. 109, dec 05 – side 179
Note: A review of Gregor Gall: "The Political Economy of Scotland: Red Scotland? Radical Scotland?" (University of Wales Press, 2005), £19.99
 
Angus Calder: More than Culloden (Neil Davidson: "Discovering the Scottish Revolution, 1682-1746")
International Socialism Journal nr. 106, mar 05 – side 172
Note: A review of Neil Davidson, Discovering the Scottish Revolution, 1682-1746 (Pluto Press, 2003), £19.99.
 
Chris Bambery: Scottish Socialist Party: Why did they dump Tommy Sheridan?
Socialist Worker nr. 1930, dec 04 – side 4
Note: TORY LEADER Michael Howard was made to look a fool recently after sacking Boris Johnson for having an affair. The private life of a politician carries few surprises for most people, and doesn’t rate on the same level as telling multiple lies to justify war.
 
Klaus B. Jensen: Skotske vuggestuepædagoger strejker: Viljen til sejr
Socialistisk Arbejderavis nr. 229, maj 04 – side 5
Note: Skotske vuggestuepædagoger har strejket siden starten af marts og giver ikke op.
 
Neil Davidson: In perspective: Tom Nairn
International Socialism Journal nr. 82, mar 99 – side 97
Note: Scotland's independence has always had a fierce left wing champion in Tom Nairn, whose work has done much to shape socialist thinking on the future of the British state. Neil Davidson's detailed examination of Nairn's work, the latest in our 'In perspective' series, carefully exposes the weaknesses in his position and suggests a more theoretically consistent alternative.
 
Neil Davidson + Donny Gluckstein: Nationalism and the class struggle in Scotland
International Socialism Journal nr. 48, sep 90 – side 107
Note: Scottish nationalism has been the subject of much discussion but little analysis. Here Neil Davidson and Donny Gluckstein look at the history of the Scottish nation and map out the response that socialists should take to today's nationalists.
 
Nordirland
Sean Mitchell: Rediscovering the Road Less Travelled: Lessons of Gerry Carroll's Election Victory
Irish Marxist Review (Irland) nr. 10, jun 14 – side 44
Note: Two roads diverged in a wood, and I took the one less travelled by, And that has made all the difference.
‘I am not a Nationalist or a Unionist; I Am a Socialist.’ This was the plain and unadorned phrase that newly elected Belfast city councillor Gerry Carroll used to announce his arrival on the political scene. Its innate message was clear: the long and protracted isolation of the radical Left in Belfast is now over.
 
Stewart Smyth: Privatising the anomaly – public housing in Northern Ireland
Irish Marxist Review (Irland) nr. 6, jun 13 – side 45
Note: For over four decades the delivery of public housing in Northern Ireland had been little changed, with one unified public housing provider across the six counties.
 
Colm Bryce: Back to the Armed Struggle? The Dissidents Analysed
Irish Marxist Review (Irland) nr. 5, mar 13 – side 25
Note: On a gable wall at the top of Westland Street, in the Bogside in Derry, a billboard was erected in 2009, shortly after Sinn Féin leader Martin McGuinness denounced the republicans who had just killed police officer Stephen Carroll in Craigavon as ‘traitors to the island of Ireland’. Illustrated with a photo of an armed British soldier, it reads: Those who administer British rule are traitors. They haven’t gone away you know Iraq, Afghanistan, Ireland.
 
Goretti Horgan: The State of Loyalism
Irish Marxist Review (Irland) nr. 5, mar 13 – side 46
Note: Anyone visiting the North of Ireland these days cannot drive through any city, town or hamlet there without finding part or all of it bedecked with massive union flags. From December 2012 into the early months of 2013, to the time of writing, Belfast and all of the North has seen almost daily protests about the union flag, some ending in riots; all featuring vicious sectarianism on the streets.
 
John Lyons: 100 Years of the Ulster Covenant
Irish Marxist Review (Irland) nr. 4, dec 12 – side 66
Note: The years 2012-2022 will be a decade of commemorations, as the centenary anniversaries of some of the defining events of twentieth century Irish history are remembered, celebrated, re-analysed and revised: from the all out class warfare of the Dublin Lock-out of 1913; the First World War 1914-1918; the Easter Rising and the slaughter on the Somme in 1916; to the outbreak of the War of Independence in 1917; through to the partitioning of the island of Ireland and the establishment of two states, north and south, in the early 1920s.
 
Brian Kelly: Neoliberal Belfast: Disaster Ahead?
Irish Marxist Review (Irland) nr. 2, jun 12 – side 44
Note: Buried beneath the hype surrounding the launch of Belfast’s ‘Titanic Signature Project’ in mid-April was a small detail that managed to get a brief airing in Belfast’s council chambers a few weeks later: working-class communities across the city had ‘missed out on the dividend’ arising from the project, which failed to meet even the minimal ‘social responsibility’ goals that the city had set in exchange for fast-tracking the project through planning and handing over 10m in ratepayer’s money.
 
Simon Basketter: Bobby Sands: ‘Our revenge will be the laughter of our children’
Socialist Worker nr. 2250, maj 11 – side 8
Note: Simon Basketter looks at the life of Bobby Sands, a Republican who died in prison after a hunger strike that won support around the world and challenged the dominant view of “the Troubles” in Northern Ireland.
 
Simon Basketter: Northern Ireland: Scandal of sectarianism
Socialist Worker nr. 2184, jan 10 – side 6
Note: Peter Robinson, the first minister of Northern Ireland, has resigned – temporarily, he claims. His wife Iris Robinson, a Northern Ireland Assembly member and MP, admitted an affair with a 19 year old.
 
Goretti Horgan: Letter from ...: Northern Ireland
Socialist Review nr. 338, jul 09 – side 9
Note: Attacks on Roma families have shocked many, but politicians must shoulder much of the blame.
 
Gordon Hewitt: Belfast: Community unites to resist attacks on Roma
Socialist Worker nr. 2157, jun 09 – side 5
Note: The simmering sectarianism that dominates Northern Ireland boiled over last week as a series of racist attacks forced more than 100 members of the Roma community out of their homes in Belfast.
 
Belfast Visteon workers discuss the deal (online only)
Socialist Worker nr. 2150, maj 09 
Note: Ford-Visteon workers in Belfast have been occupying their plant for over five weeks after they were sacked with no notice and no redundancy pay at the end of March.
 
Judith Orr: Northern Ireland
Socialist Review nr. 335, apr 09 – side 5
Note: When Barack Obama announced George Mitchell as his "peace envoy" in the Middle East there was praise for his choice of the "peacebroker" of Northern Ireland (NI). Yet only two months later the peace was shattered when two British soldiers and then a police officer were killed by Republican groups.
 
New Derry protest against Raytheon's complicity in Israel's war crimes (online only)
Socialist Worker nr. 2135, jan 09 
Note: Nine women protested in Derry, Northern Ireland, to stop Raytheon selling military components to Israel.
 
Derry occupation gets results
Socialist Worker nr. 2130, dec 08 – side 5
Note: Workers at Calcast in Derry, Northern Ireland, have won better redundancy pay after occupying their factory. The plant makes parts for Ford. Some 90 redundancies were announced there.
 
Goretti Horgan: Abortion: is this the moment?
Socialist Review nr. 328, sep 08 – side 5
Note: Imagine living where the prime minister believes in creationism, the chair of your parliament's health committee believes "it is the duty of government to implement god's law" and the chair of the education committee calls for creationism to be taught alongside evolution in science classes. That place is Northern Ireland (NI).
 
Raytheon 9 found not guilty (online only)
Socialist Worker nr. 2105, jun 08 
Note: The Raytheon 9 have been found not guilty of all charges of criminal damage in a unanimous verdict. The nine anti-war protesters, including campaigning journalist Eamonn McCann, occupied and shut down the Derry offices of Raytheon, the fifth biggest arms manufacturer in the world, on Wednesday 9 August 2006.
 
Raytheon 9 Trial: Anti-war campaigners on trial for ‘crime’ of solidarity
Socialist Worker nr. 2103, maj 08 – side 2
Note: As Israeli forces were pounding Lebanon in the summer of 2006, nine anti-war activists in Northern Ireland occupied the offices of arms company Raytheon Systems Limited – the UK subsidiary of the US company Raytheon.
 
Raytheon Nine trial set to start
Socialist Worker nr. 2102, maj 08 – side 2
Note: The trial of the “Raytheon Nine” anti-war activists is set to start this week in Belfast, and last for up to six weeks.
 
Kevin Devine: Reviews – Books: Ed Moloney: Paisley
Socialist Review nr. 325, maj 08 – side 27
Note: This book is the one of the best places to start when it comes to an assessment of the role in the Northern Ireland peace process of both Ian Paisley and his former deputy, Peter Robinson – who has just replaced Paisley as first minister.
 
Simon Basketter: New evidence: the reality of detention without trial in Northern Ireland
Socialist Worker nr. 2079, dec 07 – side 6
Note: A secret army document reveals brutality of internment by the British state
 
Goretti Horgan: Abortion in Northern Ireland: Access denied
Socialist Worker nr. 2075, nov 07 – side 13
Note: The 1967 Abortion Act does not apply to Northern Ireland. We need to pressure parliament to extend it, argues Goretti Horgan.
 
Simon Basketter: The inside story of British death squads in Northern Ireland
Socialist Worker nr. 2063, aug 07 – side 8
Note: British military operations have ended in Northern Ireland. Simon Basketter reveals how a campaign to terrorise Catholics was orchestrated by military intelligence.
 
Chris Bambery: The British army’s campaign against Catholics in Northern Ireland
Socialist Worker nr. 2063, aug 07 – side 9
Note: The British army ceased active duty on the streets of Northern Ireland last week – 38 years after they first arrived in Belfast and Derry. This was called Operation Banner.
 
Simon Basketter: Northern Ireland: 1907 Belfast strike showed the power to end the sectarian divide
Socialist Worker nr. 2051, maj 07 – side 13
Note: The 1907 Belfast strike wave showed the possiblity of unity between Catholics and Protestants in Northern Ireland, writes Simon Basketter
 
Kieran Allen: Northern Ireland: The death of radical republicanism
International Socialism Journal nr. 114, apr 07 – side 51
Note: Under the most moderate slogan ‘One Man, One Vote’, a civil rights movement exploded onto the streets of Derry and Belfast in the late 1960s. Its inspiration was the black civil rights movement in America and its focus was the mistreatment of the Catholic population.
 
Goretti Horgan: Northern Ireland's new troubles: The privatisation of peace
International Socialism Journal nr. 114, apr 07 – side 56
Note: Across the world, where there is conflict or catastrophe, imperialism brings privatisation to help ‘reconstruct’ the country. Naomi Klein calls it ‘disaster capitalism’.
 
Jan Hoby: Film: Bloody Sunday! Staten – morder i uniform
Socialistisk Arbejderavis nr. 221, nov 03 – side 9
Note: Den 30. januar 1972 åbnede britiske faldskærmssoldater dødelig ild mod ubevæbnede og fredelige demonstratner i alle aldre i Bogside, Derry, Irland.
 
Hazel Croft: Ireland: Mandelson's monsters
Socialist Review nr. 242, jun 00 – side 4
 
Northern Ireland's new Executive: It is time for class politics
Socialist Worker nr. 1675, dec 99 
Note: THE NEW Assembly in Northern Ireland has been welcomed by nearly everyone except a tiny minority of hardline Unionists gathered around Ian Paisley. Millions of people are hoping the new Assembly will mean the dawn of a new era of peace in Northern Ireland.
 
K Nielsen: Nordirland: Enige arbejdere en forudsætning for fred
Socialistisk Arbejderavis nr. 178, dec 99 – side 4
Note: Den 2. nov. fik nordirerne igen selvstyre efter 27 års engelsk besættelse.
 
Jørn Andersen: Fred i Nordirland?
Socialistisk Revy nr. 4, maj 98 – side 8
Note: Fredstalen i Nordirland skal til folkeafstemning den 22. maj, men vil formentlig blive vedtaget med stort flertal. Hermed er der chance for en afslutning af den krigstilstand, der har domineret det nordirske samfund i 30 år.
 
Charlie Lywood: Skrøbelig fred i Nordirland
Socialistisk Arbejderavis nr. 101, mar 94 – side 7
Note: Storbritannien og Irland forhandler om en løsning på det nordirske problem. Men deres løsning har intet at tilbyde den fattige, nordirske arbejderklasse.
 
Eamonn McCann: The roots of revolt (Derry 1968)
Socialist Review nr. 114, nov 88 – side 17
Note: On 5 October 1968 an apparently small and unimportant civil rights march took place in the city of Derry. The march led by small numbers of socialists and Republicans proved to be the spark that set Northern Ireland alight.
Twenty years on Eamonn McCann, one of the leaders of the march, analyses the beginning of the struggle and its consequenses.
 
Jason Meyler: Nordirland: Tropperne skal ud
Socialistisk Arbejderavis nr. 25, dec 86 – side 2
Note: Sidste måneds landsmøde i det irske nationalistparti Sinn Fein viste, at modstanden mod den nordirske stat og de britiske besættelsestropper ikke er knust.
 
Chris Bambery: Some notes on Northern Ireland a year after the Hunger Strikes
International Socialism Journal nr. 16, mar 82 – side 89
Note: One year after the second H-Block Hunger Strike reached its bitter climax with the death of Bobby Sands, the memory of the 10 dead Hunger Strikers has cast a dark shadow over the Catholic ghettoes of Northern Ireland. The mass demonstrations lie in the past as does the belief of 12 months ago that surely Britain’s days in Ireland were now numbered.
 
Mike Miller: Notes of the Month: Towards the Orange State
International Socialism Journal (1st series) nr. 79, jun 75 – side 4
Note: ‘Our job is to reconstruct the institutions of this state’. David Trimble, UUUC Convention member, South Belfast. ‘Any new government of Northern Ireland must possess powers equal to those of our former government.’ Herbert Heslip, UUUC Convention member, South Down. ‘UUUC Victory. Return to Stormont.’ Headline in Paisley’s Protestant Telegraph.
 
Sean Tracy: Survey: Ireland
International Socialism Journal (1st series) nr. 37, jun 69 – side 8
Note: The resignation of O’Neill is unlikely to affect the underlying drift to semi-civil war conditions in Northern Ireland. Chichester-Clarke represents a further important concession by the official Unionist party machine to the growing power of the Paisleyites.
 

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Mail: isu@socialister.dk

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